Engineering Manufacture Technician – Higher Apprenticeship Level 4

The broad purpose of the occupation is to provide specialist technical support for engineers, so that organisations can develop, produce or test new/existing products, processes, or procedures to meet a customer specification in terms of quality, cost and delivery, as efficiently and effectively as possible.  An Engineering Manufacture Technician will gather information and data from a range of sources and analyse the information/data. They will make decisions, solve problems and produce and/or update technical documentation, reports or specifications covering areas such as quality, reliability, production schedules/targets, costing or other technical documentation that informs others, either internally or externally what needs to be done such as how a product must be designed, manufactured, tested, modified, maintained, stored, transported, commissioned or decommissioned.

When Can I Start an Apprenticeship?

Looking for a new career, job or maybe a qualification to take your current role to the next level?

Previously apprenticeships were primarily aimed towards 16-18 year olds but government reforms introduced in March 2017 mean that there is no longer an upper age limit for commencing an apprenticeship, even if you already possess a degree or higher level qualification (all applicants must be eligible for funding).

Starting an apprenticeship is dependent on your age and whether you have secured an offer of an apprenticeship from an employer.

You can apply for an apprenticeship while you’re still at school, but you cannot start until you have officially left school and completed your exams.

You need to be 16 or over by the end of the summer holidays to start the apprenticeship.

Provided you have left school and have an employment offer in place, then starting employment as an apprentice can occur throughout the year.

If you successfully apply for a vacancy, you may be able to start employment straight away.

Likewise, if you are already in employment and your employer is looking to train you through an apprenticeship, sign-up and enrolment can take place quite quickly.

However, the start date for attending college for training, where required, or if delivered online, when sessions begin, will vary depending on the type of apprenticeship.

Some apprenticeships will have fixed attendance with training on-campus commencing at the start of the autumn term, with no availability for starting the training mid-year.

For other apprenticeships where the training is delivered entirely online, it may be possible to commence the training immediately.

Whichever delivery method applies, this will be communicated to you and your employer post-employment and sign-up.

Course Info
How to Apply
Employers Info
Role Overview

This occupation is found in large and small engineering and manufacturing organisations providing products and services throughout a wide range of sectors, such as Automotive, Aerospace/Airworthiness, Chemical Processing, Land Systems, Marine, Maritime Defence, Materials Manufacturers and their respective supply chains. Research indicates that the sector needs to recruit approximately 124,000 engineers and technicians every year.

Typical Engineering Manufacture Technician job titles Include: 

Manufacturing engineer quality, Manufacturing production engineer, Manufacturing procurement engineer, Quality engineer, Costing engineer, Test and commissioning engineer, Installation engineer, Process engineer, Production support engineer.

Occupational Profile

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with their line manager to confirm departmental programmes of work and to agree individual responsibilities. This in turn will align to an overarching organisational resource and delivery plan. Engineering Manufacturing  Technicians can be office based, manufacturing/plant based or more commonly combination of both, working with engineering and/or manufacturing teams at an operational level such as with production team leaders and/or management level working with specialist quality or design engineers. As well as liaising with internal colleagues, they may also be responsible for working directly with customers and/or suppliers or with representatives from appropriate regulatory bodies. Typically this would involve interaction with auditors to demonstrate compliance to specific organisational or regulatory requirements (such as Civil Aviation Authority).Their time will be spent between working in an office environment and working in the manufacturing environment or visiting customers or suppliers as and when required.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for the quality, safety and delivery of the manufactured product or service, ensuring it is delivered to the customer on time at the agreed cost. They will typically report to an engineering or manufacturing manager as part of a cross functional team, the size of this team and responsibilities will vary depending on the size of the employer. Although working within defined quality processes and procedures, they are responsible for the delivery, quality and accuracy of the work they complete. They have the autonomy to use judgement when undertaking the occupational duties and applying their technical knowledge, skills and behaviours in a wide range of contexts and environments. They use a range of tools and techniques to support decision making and solve problems that are often complex and non-routine. They also have a responsibility to identify and contribute to making improvements such as business processes, procedures, ways and methods of working.

Occupational Duties

Occupation duties

Duty

KSBs

Duty 1 Ensure the safe and efficient performance of every production task in compliance with company procedures, approved engineering data and local Health and Safety requirements. Ensure Safe Systems of Work and risk assessments (assisting as necessary in the completion of risk assessments) are adhered to for engineering or manufacturing activities.K5 K7 K9 K10 K11 K13 K23

S8

B1 B5 B6 B7

Duty 2 Prepare product and process documentation by collecting, analysing, and summarising information and trends.K1 K6 K7 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K20 K21

S1 S3 S6 S7 S8 S9

B4 B6 B7

Duty 3 Manage internal and/or Supplier Quality Notifications, and liaison with the required stakeholders for resolution.K1 K2 K5 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K14

S1 S2 S3 S5 S6 S8

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 4 Liaise with internal and external customers to implement programme initiatives, such as the application of lean analysis methods, processes and tools.K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K14 K16 K17 K18 K19 K20 K23

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 5 Carry out new product introduction and/or existing product modifications within engineering and/or manufacturing by contributing to activities such as facilitation of quality activities (including any testing and/or commissioning requirements), supplier approvals, gate reviews.K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K16 K17 K21 K22 K23

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S10

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 6 Deliver financial planning or costing analysis such as:- estimation of costs for manufacture, supplying drawings or specification for quotations, obtaining manufacture quotes, calculating costs associated with quality problem or  machine downtime.K2 K5 K6 K7 K9 K10 K11 K13 K14 K15 K19 K20 K21 K22 K23

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S8 S9 S10

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 7 Develop new technology initiatives by contributing to activities such as, justifying capital investment equipment/system upgrades from purchase through to installation and commissioning.K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K19 K21 K23

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7

Duty 8 Produce and maintain reports measuring Key Performance Indicators for data management activities.K2 K4 K5 K6 K8 K10 K13 K14 K15 K16 K17 K21 K22

S1 S2 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10

B1 B2 B6 B7

Duty 9 Ensure processes and current methods of engineering and manufacturing are as efficient and cost effective, such as:- utilising time and motion analysis, line balancing and flow to achieve the required level of production output.K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K9 K10 K11 K12 K15 K16 K17 K19 K20 K23

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S8 S9 S10

B2 B3 B4 B5 B7

Duty 10 Liaise with appropriate internal and external stakeholders at all levels to ensure that engineering and manufacturing operations are completed in line with the agreed time scales. Examples of stakeholders could include production managers, production operatives, auditors, suppliers, customers.K1 K2 K3 K4 K6 K7 K8 K13 K14 K16 K17 K19

S1 S2 S3 S5

B1 B2 B4 B5 B6

Duty 11 Ensure work process and outcomes comply with any local, national and or international regulatory or compliance requirements. Such as :- maintain  compliance to Aerospace Regulatory bodies (CAA, EASA,MAA) as well as the wider regulations (such as Anti Bribery and Corruption, Export Control ).K5 K7 K9 K10 K11 K13 K14 K15 K16

S1 S3 S6

B1 B3 B4 B6 B7

Duty 12 Resolve identified engineering and/or manufacturing problems such as:- contributing to the route cause analysis exercise applying appropriate levels of containment and corrective action.K1 K2 K5 K6 K7 K8 K10 K14 K15 K16 K17 K20 K22

S1 S3 S5 S7

B2 B7

Duty 13 Produce engineering and/or manufacturing documentation (such as:- Build Manuals, Standard Operating Instructions/processes, Bill of Materials) to aid and ensure consistent, compliant and cost effective manufacturing processes.K7 K10 K14 K16 K17

S1 S5 S7

B2 B3

Duty 14 Review engineering or manufacturing methods to determine the most effective and economical method whilst meeting drawing/specification requirementsK2 K7 K14 K16 K17 K22 K23

S1 S7 S10

B2 B3 B6 B7

Knowledge | Skills | Behaviours

Knowledge

K1: Problem solving tools/techniques. Such as practical problem solving (PPS), root cause analysis (RCA) and process failure mode effects analysis (PFMEA).

K2: Effective communication techniques including listening, questioning and support of others.

K3: Use, benefits and applications of lean methods and tools used in manufacturing and engineering (such as Kaizen, Six Sigma and 8 wastes).

K4: How Industry 4.0 will impact organisations, including the integration of automation, digital systems and manufacturing engineering systems.

K5: Quality management systems used such as ISO9001, AS9100, ISO 14001 and TS16949, its purpose and internal governance arrangements to ensure compliance.

K6: Different manufacturing methods used, their applications, such as machining, joining, forming, assembling, shaping, processing, printing, moulding, extruding and casting)

K7: Principles of quality control and quality assurance in a manufacturing and engineering environment.

K8: Team integration techniques, including conflict resolution and managing difficult conversations (team working)

K9: Core engineering principles such as mathematics, science, mechanical and electrical/electronic applications relevant to manufacturing and engineering activity undertaken

K10: Importance for individuals to use and follow the organisations approved Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) and documentation recording systems and the potential implications on safety, quality and delivery if they are not adhered to.

K11: Statutory and organisation health and safety policies, procedures and regulations that must be adhered to in a manufacturing and engineering environment including the risk assessment process, procedures and documentation used within the work area.

K12: Project management techniques, such as Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT), stakeholder matrices, risk mapping, radar chart and summary risk profiles.

K13: How human factors (organisational, environment and job factors) can influence and impact individual characteristics, performance and behaviours in the workplace.

K14: Engineering and manufacturing related documentation used such as job cards / build records, 2D & 3D drawing/models, Bill of Materials (BOM), Cost Analysis Reports, Compliance  Report, Standard Operating Instructions (SOI’s), Standard Process Instructions (POI’s), Engineering Query Notifications (EQN’s) and Drawing Query Notifications (DQN’s).

K15: Prioritisation of workload/time management techniques to ensure that personal and team objectives are achieved effectively.

K16: Engineering and manufacturing data collection systems used, their format and content.

K17: How organisations manage and monitor internal and or supplier performance to ensure that cost, quality, delivery and sustainability objectives are being delivered.

K18: Use and applications of common metallic and non – metallic materials used in manufacturing and engineering.

K19: Different production methods used and their applications such as single, batch, flow and mass.

K20: Different methods, tools and frequency used to check quality in manufacturing and engineering including measurements such as (dimensions, weight, signal, temperature, time,) and testing (such as non-destructive and destructive).

K21: Departmental process used to create, record and review financial data and information.

K22: The different applications and limitations of computer based software system/packages used such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), Data Analytics and Databases

K23: The impact of sustainability and environmental efficiency and how such matters influence manufacturing decisions.

Skills

S1 Read and extract relevant engineering and manufacturing related data and information (such as workplans/project plans ,schedules,  drawings, specifications, production data, quality reports, costing data, statistical information) drawing accurate conclusions and making informed decisions.

S2 Use project management tools, such as Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT), stakeholder matrices, risk mapping, radar chart and summary risk profiles

S3 Use problem solving tools such as Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Process Failure Modes Effects Analysis (PFMEA), Fishbone, Practical Problem Solving (PPS) and Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP).

S4 Analyse and interpret data and information in order to generate manufacturing engineering documentation such as Parts Per Million (PPM) quality adherence, cost analysis and test data.

S5 Communicate using the appropriate method for the audience such as, formal and informal presentations, written reports, verbal, electronic, social media and incorporating relevant and appropriate data and/or metrics.

S6 Use the approved process and quality compliance procedure to create or amend engineering and/or manufacturing documentation.

S7 Use lean tools and techniques, such as Six Sigma, 8 Wastes, Workplace organisation such as  5S’s (sort, set in order, shine, standardise and sustain), Kaizen and Poka-Yoke (Error proofing),

S8 Apply documentation control processes and procedures such as format, location, access, authorisation.

S9 Use financial planning, recording and review processes and documentation such as departmental budgets, estimating, cost control, cost forecasting, and investment appraisal

S10 Use computer based software system/packages such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), Data Analytics and Databases.

Behaviour

B1: Champions the importance of adherence to the organisation’s Environmental, Health and Safety management systems:- actively displays and promotes a safety first culture within the organisation.

B2: Operates in a systematic, proactive and transparent way.

B3: Actively promotes the case for the adoption of emerging and advanced engineering and manufacturing  technologies to optimise performance.

B4: Takes full responsibility for own professional development, seeking opportunities to enhance  knowledge, skills and experience. Keeping abreast of developments in engineering processes manufacturing and emerging technologies.

B5: Complies with statutory and organisational health & safety regulations and policies at all times. Accepts responsibility for their workload with a responsible approach to risk. Demonstrates a high level of motivation and resilience when facing challenge.

B6: Creates and maintains positive, professional, trusting and ethical  working relationships with their  team and the wider range of internal, external and connected stakeholders.

B7: Acts professionally with a positive and respectful attitude.

Qualifications

Mandatory Qualifications

All apprentices undertaking this apprenticeship (both those in the aerospace and non-aerospace sectors) must achieve:

Mandatory qualification: Higher National Certificate in Engineering or Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Manufacturing Operations

Ofqual regulated

Level of qualification: 4

English and maths qualifications

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment.  For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.

Professional recognition

IET / Eng Tech

IMechE / Eng Tech

Entry Requirements

5 GCSE’s at Grade C or above, including Mathematics, English and a Science, Technology or Engineering related subject, as well as A Levels at grade C or above in both a Mathematical based subject and a Science, Technology, Engineering or additional Mathematics related subject, or 90+ credits in an Engineering BTEC at level 3. *(As further guidance, the level of Mathematics has an advisory GCSE level of grade B (Grade 5/6 in the new numerical GCSE grading system).

College Attendance

In conjunction with assessment in the workplace, some college attendance at Colchester Institute will be required and this will be comfirmed post-application. Attendance and progress is closely monitored by the assessor towards the qualifications and your employer will be informed of any non-activity.

Assessment

This section sets out the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the Engineering Manufacturing Technician apprenticeship standard. It is for end-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) who need to know how EPA for this apprenticeship must operate. It will
also be of interest to Engineering Manufacturing Technician apprentices, their employers and training providers.

Full time apprentices will typically spend 42 months on-programme (before the gateway) working towards the occupational standard, with a minimum of 20% off-the-job training. All apprentices must spend a minimum of 12 months on-programme.

The EPA period should only start, and the EPA be arranged, once the employer is satisfied that the apprentice is deemed to be consistently working at or above the level set out in the occupational standard, all of the pre-requisite gateway requirements for EPA have been met
and can be evidenced to an EPAO. Apprentices must prepare and submit a portfolio of evidence to support the EPA professional discussion.

As a gateway requirement, all apprentices must achieve the following qualification:

• Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Engineering or Level 4 Higher National Certificate
in Manufacturing Operations

End-point assessment (which will typically take three months)Assessment method 1:
Observation with questioningWith the following grades:
• fail
• passAssessment method 2:
Professional discussion supported by portfolio of evidence
With the following grades:
• fail
• pass
• distinction
Overall EPA/apprenticeship grade:
• fail
• pass
• distinction
Professional RecognitionAligns with recognition as Engineering Technician (EngTech)
by:
• Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET)
• Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

Requirements in the Workplace

Students are required to be employed in a suitable work placement. Skilled and knowledgeable staff in the workplace will be necessary to support the apprentice.

To apply for this apprenticeship please read through the information below and then click the ‘Apply Online’ button from the menu located further down the page where you will be able to proceed with your application.

In order to enrol onto this apprenticeship programme you must either:

  • be already in employment in a suitable role with an employer willing to put you through the apprenticeship training

or

  • have an employer willing to appoint you as an apprentice in a suitable role and put you through the apprenticeship training

If you are unsure about any of the above and would like to speak to our apprenticeships team directly then please contact us using the below:

01206 712043 – Applicant Enquiries or email:

ci.apprenticeships@colchester.ac.uk

Employer Enquiries

If you would be interested to find out more about how this apprenticeship can work for your business or already have a member of staff who this apprenticeship would be perfect for please contact us using the ‘Hire an Apprentice: Enquire Here’ button in the menu below.

Apprenticeships FAQ

How is my business going to benefit from an Apprentice?

Fill your skills gaps: an Apprentice’s training is tailored to your organisation’s needs, resulting in a loyal, motivated work force Increase productivity by developing staff skills and expertise.

Value for money: a cost effective way to attract new talent and fresh eyes into your organisation.

Cost saving: we can advertise your vacancies and recruit the best candidates for your needs.

An industry recognised professional qualification can be built into the course which your apprentice will bring back to the business, providing value for money and a return on investment in their career as well as bringing back up to date knowledge from college.

What is expected of the employer?

When taking on an apprentice, there are certain expectations that must be met by the both the employer and the apprentice. As the employer, you are expected to:

  • Pay the minimum wage for an apprentice
  • Provide a full contract of employment for your apprentice
  • Offer the same benefits package to your apprentice as other employees
  • Arrange for a workplace mentor for your apprentice
  • Deliver a safe working environment
  • Ensure opportunities are made available to allow the learning of new skills and knowledge within the apprentice’s contracted working hours
  • Ensure the apprentice is given opportunities within contracted working hours to develop maths and English skills, where a GCSE grade A-C (or higher) has not been previously attained

What will this cost my business?

Levy paying employers can access levy funds to pay for this programme, and our blended learning model can contribute to the 20% off- the-job training requirement.

The introduction of the Apprenticeship Levy in April 2017 has changed the way that government funds apprenticeships in England. All businesses operating within the UK with a wage bill of over £3million are required to contribute to the Apprenticeship Levy.

  • If the levy applies to your business you will be required to pay 0.5% of your entire wage bill into the levy. This will be offset against a levy allowance worth £15,000 for each tax year.
  • You will only be able to use your levy payment for government backed apprenticeships.
  • Levy payments will expire after 18 months.

Speak to an Advisor at CI Business Solutions on 01206 712727 to make your levy payments work for you.

Non-levy paying employers will need to contribute 5% of the maximum funding band as published by the Skills Funding Agency for the delivery of training and assessment for their apprenticeship.

Levy paying employers will pay the full cost of the agreed funding band using their Digital Apprenticeship account.

Employers with less than 50 employees who are recruiting an apprentice aged 16-18 years old will not be required to pay the contribution fee.

Any associated cost to the individual will be made clear at the interview.

What about support in the workplace?

Skilled and knowledgeable staff must be available to support the apprentice in the workplace.

Does the apprentice have to attend college?

College attendance where required will be communicated post-application and enrolment.

Why should I choose Colchester Institute to support my recruitment and retention?

Colchester Institute is the largest college provider of apprenticeships in Greater Essex. We are experts at connecting the right people, to the right training, to the right business – and when it comes to Apprenticeships, our Apprenticeship Advisors can support your business every step of the way.

As part of our service we can support your business with:

  • Advertising the Apprenticeship vacancy
  • Manage the applications received in line with your individual requirements
  • Match prospective candidates already known to us
  • Conduct initial pre-screening for candidates
  • Carry out visits to your premises alongside regular reviews to support you, your staff and your apprentice
  • Advice on any grants or funding where available

Our team will provide:

  • A fee free recruitment service.
  • Personal 1:1 Apprenticeship Levy advice and guidance.
  • A dedicated Account Manager.
  • Industry experienced, professional, technical trainers.
  • Bespoke programmes available upon request.
  • An Essex priority skills focus.
  • Free employer events.
Off-The-Job Training FAQ

Off-the-Job Training (OJT) is one of the key requirements for all apprenticeship standards.

Apprentices must spend 20% of their contracted working hours undertaking Off-the-Job Training, which is defined as “learning undertaken outside of the normal day-to-day working environment and leads toward the achievement of an apprenticeship.”

Off-the-Job Training must be directly relevant to the apprentice’s programme and teach them new knowledge, skills and behaviours that will help them reach competence in their occupation and ensure that apprentices are actively learning and working to attain the required knowledge and skills within their sector while enrolled in their placement program.

What does Off-the-Job Training Look Like?

Off-the-Job Training must account for at least 20% of an apprentice’s contracted working hours within their full-time employment as an apprentice.

This means that their time might be broken down like the below:

  • 5 x 7 working hours in a day = 35 working hours in a week
  • 52 working weeks in a year x 35 working hours = 1820 total working hours in a year
  • 20% Off-the-Job Training requirement of the 1820 hours = 364 hours dedicated to OJT over the course of the apprenticeship
  • This is also equivalent to the apprentice spending one day per week during their 12-month apprenticeship undertaking Off-the-Job Training

The above depends on their contracted working hours within the day and/or working week, as well as the length of their programme.

For example, Apprentices working more hours in the day and the week, as well as those whose programmes are longer than 12 months in duration, then their Off-the-Job Training requirement will still consist of 20% of their contracted hours but the total number of working hours and total time dedicated to OJT will be different the above.

Why is Off-the-Job Training Conducted within the Apprentice’s Contracted Hours?

An apprenticeship is a work-based programme, and any training that contributes towards an apprentice’s development should be included in their contracted working hours.

The Department for Education (DfE) has said that it would be unreasonable to expect an apprentice to undertake training that is part of their apprenticeship in their own time, therefore if training must take place outside of the apprentice’s working hours, then this should be recognised by both the Employer and Training Provider.

An example of this would be if an apprentice has to attend a 2-hour lecture scheduled after their working hours, then arrangements should be made by the training provider and employer for the apprentice to make up the time by leaving work 2 hours early.

What does Off-the-Job Training Include?

Off-the-Job Training can include a number of activities that can take place on or off the employer’s normal work premises.

If you are unsure of whether an activity can be regarded as Off-the-Job Training, the below questions form a useful point of reference:

  • Is the activity directly relevant to the apprenticeship?
  • Is the activity teaching new knowledge, skills and behaviours?
  • Is the learning taking place in the apprentice’s contracted working hours?

If the answers to the questions are all yes, then this counts as towards OJT. These can include:

The Teaching of Theory

This can include lectures, role playing, simulation exercises, online learning, manufacturer training and so on. Teaching theory should help the apprentice better understand their role, the topics and subjects relevant to their role and their sector in more detail.

Practical Training

This can include shadowing, mentoring, industry visits, attendance at competitions and so on. This training should practically train the apprentice and teach them skills that they can use in their current job or in a future position.

Learning Support

This refers to learning support provided by the Employer or the Training Provider. Some apprentices may require more assistance in their programme to help them reach their best potential. This includes time spent conducting projects, writing assignments and so on.

Learning support counts towards OJT to ensure that all individuals have the support needed and that all barriers to education and training are removed. This could include:

  • physical adjustments
  • access to accessibility software
  • additional revision classes
  • personal support from their Training Provider.

Time spent on assignments is also included in OJT as new knowledge, skills and behaviours can be developed while completing them.

While OJT takes place outside of normal working duties, it is possible to undergo OJT at the apprentice’s workstation. For example, OJT could include learning to use a new machine or undertaking e-learning. While conducting this training, normal working duties should not be required of the apprentice.

Off-the-Job Training can also take place at home via distance learning. If there is a program of study that the apprentice can complete online that contributes to the completion of their apprenticeship, as long as the learning package is included as part of a blended learning programme, this can be counted as an OJT activity.

The activity that the apprentice undertakes is the main focus of OJT. As long as the OJT activity actively contributes to the completion of the apprenticeship, the location matters less than the activity itself.

Essentially OJT is Employers or Training Providers setting aside time for the apprentice to improve themselves, their knowledge and/or their skills.

Off-the-Job Training cannot include:

  • Enrolment
  • Induction, including any basic safety, compliance or diversity training
  • Training to acquire knowledge, skills and behaviours that are not required in the standard or framework
  • Progress reviews or on-programme assessment needed for an apprenticeship framework or standard
  • Training which takes place outside the apprentice’s working hours*
  • English and maths (up to level 2) which is funded separately
  • Time spent on compulsory activities in the apprenticeship, including time spent on English and Maths qualifications

(*although, as mentioned before, there are exceptions if this time is made up within their working hours)

The government acknowledges that apprentices will inevitably want to spend time outside of working hours to familiarise themselves with their work. However, any personal initiative shown by the apprentice will not count towards Off-the-Job Training.

Any time that an apprentice takes to conduct OJT is counted towards their normal working hours. That means that if an apprentice is interested in undertaking training outside of their working hours, they should ask their Employer and Training Provider first and see if arrangements can be made to accommodate this.

Preparing for Off-the-Job Training?

It is the responsibility of the Employer and Training Provider to ensure that the apprentice spends 20% of their apprenticeship undertaking Off-the-Job Training. Completion of OJT must be documented and evidenced in order for the apprentice to complete the apprenticeship.

In order to comply with the funding rules, each apprentice should receive a commitment statement from the Employer/Training Provider outlining the program of training the apprentice will receive and how the Employer/Training Provider intends to spend the Off-the-Job Training time. The recipient of ESFA funding (usually the main provider) should keep, update and maintain the relevant files.

The ESFA will remain flexible about the type of evidence that should be retained and provided. They want Training Providers and Employers to use naturally occurring evidence where it is available. Many Training Providers have their own systems of collecting and storing evidence. Some examples of naturally occurring evidence might include:

  • Apprentice timesheets
  • Training logs
  • Registers
  • HR training systems

For more details and examples on how to proceed with Off-the-Job Training, you can click here to see the full OJT document from the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

Funding and Financial Support FAQ

What will this cost my Business?

Non-levy paying employers will need to contribute 5% of the maximum funding band as published by the Skills Funding Agency for the delivery of training and assessment for their apprenticeship. Levy paying employers will pay the full cost of the agreed funding band using their Digital Apprenticeship account.

Apprenticeship Funding Bands

Apprenticeship Funding Bands
Employers with less than 50 employees who are recruiting an apprentice aged 16-18 years old will not be required to pay the contribution fee. Any associated cost to the individual will be made clear at the interview.

How is the Apprenticeship funded?

Full government funding is available for an apprentice aged between 16-18 years old and where the employer employs less than 50 employees. Full funding is also available for apprentices aged 19 to 24 who have either been in care or has an education health care plan.

An employer contribution fee will be required for:

  • Non-levy paying employers recruiting an apprentice aged 19 or over
  • Non-levy paying employers who employ more than 50 employees and recruit a 16-18 year old apprentice

Payment plans and schedules  can be discussed with our apprenticeship Account Managers prior to signing contracts. For more information about apprenticeship contribution fees please contact one of our Apprenticeship Advisers  on 01206 712727.

Apprentice Minimum Wage

A National Minimum Wage for apprentices was introduced on 1 October 2010. The wage applies to all apprentices aged under 19; and apprentices aged 19 or over in the first year of their Apprenticeship.

As of April 1st 2023 the national minimum wage for apprentices is £5.28 an hour and applies to time working, plus time spent training that is part of the Apprenticeship. This rate applies to apprentices under 19 and those aged 19 or over who are in their first year. Apprentices must be paid at least the national minimum wage rate if they’re an apprentice aged 19 or over and have completed their first year.

Employers are free to pay above the new wage and many do so, but employers must ensure that they are paying their apprentices at least the minimum wage. If an apprentice is on a higher wage, the employer must continue to pay that for the remainder of the training or until the apprentice becomes eligible for the full national minimum wage.

You must be at least:

  • school leaving age to get the National Minimum Wage
  • aged 23 to get the National Living Wage – the minimum wage will still apply for workers aged 22 and under

Current rates

These rates are for the National Living Wage (for those aged 23 and over) and the National Minimum Wage (for those of at least school leaving age). The rates change on 1 April every year.

 23 and over21 to 2218 to 20Under 18Apprentice
April 2023£10.42£10.18£7.49£5.28£5.28

Apprentices

Apprentices are entitled to the apprentice rate if they’re either:

  • aged under 19
  • aged 19 or over and in the first year of their apprenticeship

Example: An apprentice aged 21 in the first year of their apprenticeship is entitled to a minimum hourly rate of £5.28.

Apprentices are entitled to the minimum wage for their age if they both:

  • are aged 19 or over
  • have completed the first year of their apprenticeship

Example: An apprentice aged 21 who has completed the first year of their apprenticeship is entitled to a minimum hourly rate of £10.18

Previous rates

The following rates were for the National Living Wage (previously for those aged 25 and over) and the National Minimum Wage (for those of at least school leaving age) from April 2016.

From 1st April 2021 the National Living Wage was extended to 23 and 24 year olds.

Financial Information and Support

Government support

Employers are not required to pay Class 1 National Insurance contributions for an apprentice, if the apprentice:

  • is under 25 years old
  • is on an approved UK government apprenticeship standard or framework (these can differ depending on UK country)
  • earns less than £967 a week (£50,270 a year)

Employers with fewer than 50 people working for them will be able to train 16-18-year-old apprentices without making a contribution towards the costs of training. The government will pay 100% of the training costs for these individuals.

Funding

The government will pay employers, no matter what size, £1,000 for each 16-18 year old apprentice they employ.

Eligibility 

All employers are eligible for a £1,000 payment for taking on an apprentice who is either:

  • aged 16 to 18 years old
  • under 25 and has an education, health and care plan or has been in the care of their local authority

This £1000 payment will be paid to your training provider and you will receive it from them.

When you’ll get paid

We’ll send the payment in 2 equal instalments for each apprentice.

To be eligible, your apprentice must complete:

  • 90 days of their apprenticeship for your first payment
  • 365 days of their apprenticeship for your second payment

Once the apprenticeship information has been checked, we will process the payments.

Payments will be made on the 14th working day of the month, it can take up to 3 days for the payments to reach your account.

You can track when your payments are due to be paid on your view applications page.

We cannot send any payments until we’ve received and verified the organisation and finance details. This could take up to 80 days.

The apprenticeship levy
The levy was introduced on 6 April 2017 and is charged at a rate of 0.5% of an employers’ pay bill, paid through PAYE on a monthly basis.

Each employer has a levy allowance of £15,000, this is not a cash payment. It works in a similar way to the personal tax allowance and cannot be used to purchase apprenticeship training.

The impact of the allowance means that fewer than 1.3% of UK employers, those with an annual pay bill of more than £3 million, are liable to pay the levy. Employers in England who pay the levy
will be able to get out more than they pay in, through a 10% top-up to their online accounts.

An employer’s pay bill is made up of the total amount of the employees’ earnings that are subject to Class 1 National Insurance contributions, such as:

– wages
– bonuses
– commissions
– pension contributions

What about non-levy paying employers?

Employers with a pay bill of less than £3 million a year will not need to pay the levy.

At least 90% of non-levy paying employers’ apprenticeship training and assessment costs in England will be paid for by the government. The government will ask these employers to make a 5% contribution to the cost, paid directly to the provider, and the government covers the rest. This cost will be spread over the lifetime of the apprenticeship.

The government is offering additional support to organisations with fewer than 50 employees* by paying 100% of training and assessment costs for their apprentices aged 16-18 and for those aged 19-24 formerly in care or with a local authority education, health and care plan.

Higher Apprenticeship Level 4 - Engineering Manufacture Technician
Course Outline: Designed to provide the manufacturing and engineering sector with high grade technicians and engineers

If you are ready to make an application then please click the Apply Online button in the menu below.

LevelLevel 4
LocationColchester
Duration42 months (this does not include EPA period)
Campus / Adult Skills CentreColchester Campus
Apprenticeship Funding Band (Levy paying employers)£21,000
Employer Contribution Fee (Non-levy paying employers)£1,050

Disclaimer

All fees, prices and funding information shown on this page are for courses starting in the 2023-24 academic year unless stated otherwise, and are correct at the time of entering/printing information, however these may be subject to change due to factors outside of our control. The College cannot accept legal or financial liability as a result of any such changes.

Courses fees are generally not confirmed for September until June / July due to the above factors.

The course information describes programmes offered by Colchester Institute. The College takes all reasonable steps to provide courses as described, but cannot guarantee provision. The information is for guidance and does not form any part of a contract.

The College reserves the right to update and amend information as and when necessary. Colchester Institute will do its best to provide the courses shown, but may have to modify or withdraw a course depending on customer demand and other factors.