BA (Hons) Policing Practice

Are you thinking of joining the police or working in the wider criminal justice sector, such as the prison service, security industry or local government?

It was announced in December 2016 by the governing body of the Police Service, The College of Policing, that by 2020 all new police officers would require a relevant degree.

This new BA (Hons) in Policing Practice programme* offers students an opportunity to gain a critical understanding policing and its historical, social, economic and political contexts. The skills and knowledge you gain on this course will prepare you for work with many criminal justice organisations.

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Course IntroductionModulesEntry RequirementsGraduate CareersAdditional

Taught by industry qualified lecturers with policing experience you will develop the knowledge and practical skills required for a career in policing and related professions such as;

• Police Officer
• Police Staff
• Border Force Officer
• Work in the court system or in prisons
• Roles with local authorities or third sector organisations

This programme is designed to be vocationally based in order to develop both practical as well as theoretical skills via a variety of methods in order create a truly employable graduate for these professions.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Each module is worth a specified number of credits, with most modules counting for 40 or 20 academic credits, with each credit taken equating to a total amount of study time which includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity.

Most full-time students will take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. A total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits are needed for an honours degree as a whole. Overall grades for the course and degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.

Year One (Level 4) Year Two (Level 5) Year Three (Level 6)

UCAS Tariff
64 points

A level: C D D
Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016): MPP

All applicants will be required to have achieved GCSEs in English Language and Maths at grades 9-4 or A-C. Other level two maths and english qualifications will be considered on a case by case basis.

*UCAS Tariff points where shown, are for entry on to higher education programmes starting from September 2021.

International applicants

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking), or an equivalent English Language qualification.

Additional requirements for International Students:

  • You must provide evidence of having been in general education for at least 10 years and of having studied within the last five years
  • a face-to-face interview is required before an offer is made.

The skills and knowledge you gain on this course will prepare you for work with many criminal justice organisations. You will develop the knowledge and practical skills required for a career in policing and related professions such as;

• Police Officer
• Police Staff
• Border Force Officer
• Work in the court system or in prisons
• Roles with local authorities or third sector organisations

Timetables: Timetables are normally available one month before registration. Please note that while we make every effort to ensure that timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week. Part-time classes are normally scheduled on one or two days per week.

Teaching and Learning: You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and practicals. Seminars enable smaller group discussions to develop understanding of topics covered in lectures.

When not attending lectures, seminars and practicals or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-directed study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the library, learning zone or technical learning resources, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations

Assessment: The course provides you with opportunities to test your understanding of the subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally contains at least one piece of practice or ‘formative’ assessment for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark.

There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. Assessment methods include written examinations and a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations and your final year major project. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

 Feedback: You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

ApplyFull-Time
BA (Hons) Policing Practice (Full-time)
LevelLevel 6
LocationColchester
Duration3 Years
UCAS CodeP100
Academic Year2021-2022
Study ModeFull-Time
Start DateSeptember 2021
Fee(s)2020-21: £8,250 per year
Awarding/Validation BodyUniversity of East Anglia
Year One (Level 4)

Module title:

Module Code and Title:

Research and Study Skills (01C) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module will provide sound knowledge of the relevance and importance of independent study skills which will include social science research theories, referencing and digital literacy skills to research practice within the field of policing.

What do I learn?

Know the principles and concepts associated with research theories. Evaluate and interpret quantitative and qualitative data. Make sound judgements and present lines of arguments in accordance with research theories and concepts  around policing

What’s the assignment?

A 2,500 word report with reference to a relevant field of policing, demonstrating the ability to make sound judgments and arguments from reviewing literature and analysing data.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Victims of crime and its effects on society (02C) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module will focus on victims of crime who can often feel under-represented within the context of a criminal offence and its subsequent investigation. Students will learn about the complex social nature of victimisation and will be expected to examine case studies, data, government initiatives, victimology theory, police and other agency responses and in order to evaluate and understand its complex nature. Students will also consider the wider effects that victimisation has on society

What do I learn?

Know the underlying key concepts and principles of theoretical approaches associated with victims of crime. Appraise data to develop lines of argument concerning political and social processes of victimisation in accordance with basic victimology theories. Present a case study on a chosen police service or related agency concerning its responses to victimisation and community safety.

What’s the assignment?

  • A written assignment discussing political and social responses to victims of crime cross referenced against relevant victimology  theory (2000 words):
  • A presentation analysing the performance of a police service or related agency of your choice and its response to victims of crime. (500 words):

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

General Police Duties and common offences (04C) (40 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module will help students understand the general principles of some commonly used criminal and common law and, a knowledge of some defences available in law. It will examine the day-to­ day common offences that are dealt with by police officers relating to dishonesty, criminal damage, violence and public disorder.

What do I learn?

Understand and interpret the concepts and principles of criminal law and criminal law defences. Assess the impact of criminal and common law in tackling offending behaviour and how his impacts on society. Evaluate the main forms of sentencing and alternatives available to the courts and its effectiveness in public safety.

What’s the assignment?

A one hour multiple choice law examination covering aspects of the module.

Analysis of a recent and detailed case study of your choice. You will analyse the offence committed and the sentence given to formulate a report, containing your view on fairness and the impact on the victim. (2,500 words).

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Health and Wellbeing in the public sector (OSC) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

In this module students will learn how to recognise and self-manage stress at work, by considering a range of strategies from workload management, fitness, healthy eating and good general wellbeing.

What do I learn?

Understand the difficulties on new recruits when transitioning to the emergency services and identify coping strategies. Consider the impact of fitness and nutrition on health and wellbeing. Create a personal coping strategy including a fitness and diet plan for the future wellbeing.

What’s the assignment?

2,500 word personal health plan, considering the impact of transitioning to the emergency services,  to include work life balance,  fitness and diet.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

The Role Of Police Service In Society And Their Powers DUBAPPF4D  (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

In this module students will examine the timeline of the Police Service from its early formation to present day contemporary policing. It will focus on the difficulties facing the police in the 21st century from the level and pattern of crime, police expenditure, human rights and public safety.

What do I learn?

Students will consider how the police service is organised in relation to the criminal justice system, national and international policing, intelligence led policing and its relationship with government and its policies.

What’s the assignment?

Case study presentation at case conference 50% (equivalent to 1000 words)

Written report and historical timeline. 50% (1,500 words)

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Year Two (Level 5)

Module title:

Module Code and Title:

Controlling and Intimidating Crimes (11i) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module will allow you to study and understand the nature and complexity of these often hidden, yet prolific crimes that can lead to immense upset to both the individual and the communities in which they occur. This area of policing often accounts for a large proportion of the front line officers’ workload, which is also very topical in Government and charitable organisations initiatives. Topics to be studied include Hate, Religious, LGBT, Domestic Abuse and other non­ visible group based crimes and their effects.

What do I learn?

Analyse the effects of controlling and intimidation crimes on an individual. Analyse the effects of controlling and intimidation crimes on a community. Appreciate the policing style and support mechanisms that are available to counter the effects of controlling and intimidation crimes.

What’s the assignment?

Using a case study will enable the students to draw on a police incident of their choice and have a factual base from which to plan their submission.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Equality, Diversity and Professional Standards

(optional) (14i) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

During your time in the Police Service you will be expected to work with colleagues, criminals, partners and victims of crime from a wealth of background and cultures in a fair, diligent and impartial manner (taken from the Oath of Affirmation). The purpose of the module is to ensure that as a potential member of the police service you are fully aware of the rigorous and high standards that are expected of you within this profession. It will allow you to understand and discuss the key concepts of equality and diversity and know the professional level of standards that you will be expected to follow in pursuance of a police career.

What do I learn?

Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within the field of equality and diversity. Provide an analytical account of social diversity and inequality, in relation to a typical community, where the police service is expected to serve!

What’s the assignment?

A 3000 word report encouraging students to research a policing area of their choice. They are expected to interpret local data to show understanding of a chosen demographic area and include all learning outcome elements.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Human Rights and the Criminal Justice System (12i) (40 Credits)

What’s it about?

During this module you will investigate and appreciate basic human rights under the Human Rights Act 1998 along with the associated articles and protocols. Then you will investigate how the Criminal Justice system can impact on those and how it works at various levels within England and Wales, Scotland and Europe.

What do I learn?

Analyse the requirements of the Human Rights Act 1998. Analyse and appreciate the complexity of the diverse experiences of the multi-national population of the United Kingdom. Appreciate the complexity of the Criminal Justice System. Evaluate the impact of the Criminal Justice System on basic human rights.

What’s the assignment?

The 30 minutes is designed to mirror the effort for a 3000 word essay on preparation time and equal 20 credits each of the module thus the 50/50 weighting. The presentation is designed to include variety and inclusivity within the module and develop the skill set of public speaking as required by a Police Officer as a soft skill.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Serious Offences and Multi-Agency Working. (13i) (40 Credits)

What’s it about?

To build on the knowledge obtained in year one module, Law (1) relating to understanding legislation and move into more complex areas of criminal law relating to sexual offences, fraud, drugs, and youth crimes. The aim of this module is to raise awareness of how to approach crimes that are more serious and often dealt with by the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) via multi-agency working.

What do I learn?

Analyse the effectiveness of multi-agency working with serious crimes. Understand criminal legislation in regards to sexual Offences, fraud, drugs, and youth crimes. Evaluate the impact of a chosen case study in relation to legislation. Evaluate the impact of a chosen case study in relation to legislation.

What’s the assignment?

The purpose of the exam is to provide summative test law knowledge as a minimum standard. The exam type was chosen, as it is a common assessment method within the Police Service and all Police officers applying for promotion, are required to sit a formal law exam for their first two promotions.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Work Based Learning (Optional) (1Si) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

The purpose of this module is to give credit for those students who have already joined the Police Service either in the guise of a Police Officer, Special Constable or Police Community Support Officer, who have successfully completed their initial training and six months experience as they would have already covered the content of the other optional module to save replication.

What do I learn?

Evidence a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within the field of equality and diversity. Provide an analytical account of social diversity and inequality in relation to a typical community where you serve. Evidence the values, practices and processes of professional standards within the police service.

What’s the assignment?

A portfolio of evidence gathered from the police service experience.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Year Three (Level 6)

Module title:

Module Code and Title:

Terrorist and Extremist Groups (Optional) (25H) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

The purpose of this module is to give the students an understanding into internal and external terrorist groups that impact on the United Kingdom, its citizens and the policing requirements of the Country in general. It is intended to raise aware of the groups, their ideologies and targets in conjunction with the Military (EOD) and the National Crime Agency.

What do I learn?

Critically evaluate the impact of terrorist and extremist groups on the United Kingdom Police Service.

What’s the assignment?

The assessment type is mirrored over the three optional modules and will be delivered at the same time in the programme, so that all students in the cohort, regardless of optional module studied, will be shown the impact statements to increase their awareness of these three areas.

This impact statement will include impact on the police service, community, tourists, international reputation, etc.from terrorist and extremist groups.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Organised Crime and Cyber Crimes (Optional) (23H) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

Organised crime is one of the gravest threats to our national security – blighting communities, ruining lives and costing the UK well over £34 billion every year. In this module students will learn about the complexities involved in organised and cybercrime and will critically analyse the impact on the wider community and efforts made to prevent and detect such activity locally, nationally and internationally.

What do I learn?

Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within organised crime and cyber crime. Critically review recent cases concerning organised crime and cybercrime and its impact on the community, locally, nationally and internationally. Critically analyse criminal justice agency practices and developments in terms of the changing nature of organised crime and cybercrime.

What’s the assignment?

The assessment type is mirrored over three optional modules and will be delivered at the same time in the programme, so that all students in the cohort regardless of the optional module study will be shown the impact statements to increase their awareness of these three areas.
A statement on the impact on the United Kingdom Police Service from organised and cyber criminals.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Road traffic, firearms and life ending offences (21H) (40 Credits)

What’s it about?

This is the final law module for policing students and will cover; Road Traffic law. Firearms Offences and Offenders and restrictions in possession of firearms following conviction. Murder, Manslaughter  and Infanticide,  including sentencing  guidelines.

What do I learn?

Understand legislation relating to Road Traffic Law, Firearms and Murder, Manslaughter and infanticide.

What’s the assignment?                                                                

The Exam type was chosen as it is a common assessment method within the Police Service and all Police officers applying for promotion are required to sit a formal law exam for their first two promotions.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Handling Investigations and Interviews (22H) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

Students will learn the importance of ensuring that those who come into their custody are treated fairly and respectfully in accordance with guidelines and understand the implications to them or a case if they are not.

What do I learn?

Describe and examine the meaning of priority and volume crime investigations. Critically appraise Intelligence led policing and its impact on the investigate process. Critically examine the values, practices and processes of governance, including human rights that underpin the treatment of suspects within UK criminal justice systems.

What’s the assignment?

1. This is an observed practical assessment containing paperwork from detention, arrest statements, witness statement and interview recordings in a prepared crime file for submission.
2. A critical reflection to include personal reflection on the experiences gained from the exercise to include knowledge and showing understanding of PACE and investigative interviewing. Students will be expected to critically examine how restrictive some regulations appear and why they are put in place.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Final Major Dissertation (26H) (40 Credits)

What’s it about?

The aim of the final major dissertation is to give the student an opportunity to conduct a sizeable piece of research into an area of policing of their choosing. It will develop and consolidate research skills and academic writing. It will increase knowledge and understanding regarding an academically rigorous research process.

What do I learn?

Critically analyse and compare the purpose and the key features of a research process. Identify and justify a planning proposal for research of own choice, of an area of practice for research with related ethical considerations. Critically evaluate your chosen research methodology related to the area of choice. Create a comprehensive research project reflecting subject specific content, key issues and ocally and internationally contemporary concerns.

What’s the assignment?

Allowing the students to choose their police related field of study, will also allow them to study an area of personal interest and hopefully result in higher marks and greater preparation for employment or further study.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Policing in an International Context (Optional) (24H) (20 Credits)

What’s it about?

In this module students will research and learn about this international consultative policing process and critically analyse why this is seen as important to our own national security. How officers adjust to the complex nature of cultural difference, and how success or failure impacts on the wider context of stabilisation and a new world order.

What do I learn?

Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within policing in an international context. Critically review recent cases relating to policing in an international context. Critically analyse policing in an international context.

What’s the assignment?

The assessment type is mirrored over three optional modules and will be delivered at the same time in the programme, so that all students in the cohort regardless of the optional module study will be shown the impact statements to increase their awareness of these three areas.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

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All Fees and prices shown on the website are for courses starting in the 2018-19 or 2019-20 academic year and are correct at the time of entering/printing information, however these may be subject to change. The College cannot accept legal or financial liability as a result of any such changes.

The course information describes programmes offered by University Centre Colchester at Colchester Institute. The College takes all reasonable steps to provide courses as described, but cannot guarantee provision. The information is for guidance and does not form any part of a contract.

The College reserves the right to update and amend information as and when necessary. University Centre Colchester at Colchester Institute will do its best to provide the courses shown, but may have to modify or withdraw a course depending on customer demand and other factors.