Teaching Assistant Apprenticeship

A Teaching Assistant works in Primary, Special and Secondary education across all age ranges encompassing special educational needs and emotional vulnerabilities.

The primary role of the Teaching Assistant is to support the class teacher to enhance pupils’ learning either in groups or individually, ensuring pupils understand the work set, know their learning objectives and stay on task in order to make progress. Promoting self-belief, social inclusion and a high self-esteem play an integral part to pupils’ well-being; ensuring pupils thrive in a positive, nurturing, safe environment. It is an active role supporting the learner to access the curriculum. They are good role models, act with honesty and integrity, take part in team meetings; contribute to planning and class activities. Promoting Fundamental British Values through spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and positive behaviours are crucial in contributing to improved pupil progress and development.

When Can I Start an Apprenticeship?

Looking for a new career, job or maybe a qualification to take your current role to the next level?

Previously apprenticeships were primarily aimed towards 16-18 year olds but government reforms introduced in March 2017 mean that there is no longer an upper age limit for commencing an apprenticeship, even if you already possess a degree or higher level qualification (all applicants must be eligible for funding).

Starting an apprenticeship is dependent on your age and whether you have secured an offer of an apprenticeship from an employer.

You can apply for an apprenticeship while you’re still at school, but you cannot start until you have officially left school and completed your exams.

You need to be 16 or over by the end of the summer holidays to start the apprenticeship.

Provided you have left school and have an employment offer in place, then starting employment as an apprentice can occur throughout the year.

If you successfully apply for a vacancy, you may be able to start employment straight away.

Likewise, if you are already in employment and your employer is looking to train you through an apprenticeship, sign-up and enrolment can take place quite quickly.

However, the start date for attending college for training, where required, or if delivered online, when sessions begin, will vary depending on the type of apprenticeship.

Some apprenticeships will have fixed attendance with training on-campus commencing at the start of the autumn term, with no availability for starting the training mid-year.

For other apprenticeships where the training is delivered entirely online, it may be possible to commence the training immediately.

Whichever delivery method applies, this will be communicated to you and your employer post-employment and sign-up.

Course Info
How to Apply
Employers Info
Parents and Carers Info
Knowledge
KnowledgeWhat is Required:
Understanding how pupils learn and develop
  • Understand the need to provide feedback to support and facilitate an appropriate level of independence.
  • Comprehend appropriate levels of learning resources to identify and help address weakness, consolidate strengths and develop individualised expectations.
  • Recognise different stages of child development through school, eg: transition between key stages.
Technology
  • Recognise the importance of using appropriate technology to support learning.
Working with teachers to understand and support assessment for learning
  • Understand the need to accurately observe, record and report on pupil’s participation, conceptual understanding and progress to improve practice and assessment for different groups of pupils.
  • Understand the school’s assessment procedures for benchmarking against targets set by the class teacher.
  • Be familiar with assessment materials.
Curriculum
  • An appropriate knowledge of the curriculum and context you are working in.
Keeping Children Safe in Education
  • Understand current statutory guidance including ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’ Part 1, safeguarding policies, Prevent Strategy.
  • Understand the importance of sharing relevant information, in a timely manner with the designated Safeguarding lead. Understand the importance of first aid procedures, recording/reporting incidents and a broad knowledge of Health & Safety Policy.
Skills
SkillsWhat is Required:
Developing strategies for support
  • Develop strategies to support and encourage pupils to move towards independent learning.
  • Use appropriately varied vocabulary to ensure pupils’ understanding.
  • Embed effective behaviour management strategies using discipline appropriately and fairly in line with the school’s policy.
  • Deliver interventions in accordance with training given (RAG rating).
  • Foster and encourage positive, effective, nurturing and safe learning environments inspiring pupils to take pride in and learn from their individual achievements.
  • Recognise, adapt and respond to all pupils encompassing SEN/emotional vulnerabilities, for example, use Makaton, visual timetables.
Communication and team work
  • Work closely with teachers to ensure own contribution aligns with the teaching.
  • Ensure regular communication with teachers to provide clarity and consistency of role within lessons.
  • Deliver/lead small group teaching within clearly defined/planned parameters using initiative, sensitivity and understanding.
  • Build appropriate relationships with colleagues, pupils, parents, adults and stakeholders.
  • Comply with policy and procedures for sharing confidential information and know when and where to seek advice.
  • Implement current statutory guidance including ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’ Part 1, safeguarding policies, Prevent Strategy.
  • Undertake safeguarding training every 3 years.
  • Support pupils’ well-being whilst embedding the importance of online safety.
Working with teachers to accurately assess
  • Contribute to a range of assessment processes and use information effectively for example: written records.
  • Use specific feedback to help pupils make progress.
  • Apply good subject knowledge to support accurate assessment.
Using technology
  • Use school computer systems, including specialist software eg: online registration, intervention programmes and management information systems.
  • Use relevant technology competently and effectively to improve learning.
  • Ensure pupils use technology safely.
Problem solving/ability to motivate pupils
  • Use a range of strategies including scaffolding and open questioning skills to enable pupils to access and engage in learning.
  • Recognise the difference between pastoral and academic issues and model good behaviour for learning.
Behaviours
BehavioursWhat is Required:
Building relationships/ embracing change
  • Flexibility, trust, professional conduct, confidentiality and being respectful.
  • Promote the school’s efforts to build positive behaviour for learning.
  • Promote and exemplify positive behaviour and uphold the school ethos.
  • Be enthusiastic and open to new ideas.
Adding value to education
  • Praise; provide constructive and specific feedback and support pupils, helping them to achieve their maximum potential socially, emotionally and academically through peer marking and reflection.
Promoting equality, diversity and inclusion
  • Keep pupils at the centre of everything.
  • Promote community cohesion and cultural diversity encompassing a full understanding of the school’s ethos.
Professional standards and personal accountability
  • Demonstrate professional relationships in line with Staff Handbook.
  • Be diplomatic, a positive role model and maintain confidentiality.
  • Optimise learning opportunities and reflect on their personal development.
  • Demonstrate a willingness to learn and improve personal skill set.
Team working, collaboration/ engagement
  • Work collaboratively and constructively with the whole school team.
  • Engage professionally as appropriate with outside professionals.
Entry Requirements

What are the entry requirements?

Whilst any entry requirements will be a matter for individual employers, typically an apprentice might be expected to have already achieved 5 GCSEs, including Maths and English, Grade C or above or 4/5 (new grading). Some employers will accept other relevant qualifications and experience, including a relevant Level 2 qualification.

What Can I Do Next?

As well as ensuring full competency as a Teaching Assistant, this standard provides a foundation for potential progression into a number of career paths in the Educational sector including Higher Level Teaching Assistant, Assistant Teacher and Teacher.

Assessment

This section sets out the requirements and process for the end-point assessment (EPA) of the Teaching Assistant Level 3 apprenticeship standard. It is written for end-point assessment organisations (EPAO) who need to know how the EPA for this apprenticeship must operate. It will also be of interest to teaching assistant apprentices, their employers and training providers.

Full time apprentices will spend typically 18 months on-programme working towards the apprenticeship standard, with a minimum of 20% off-the-job training.

The EPA should only start once the employer is satisfied that the apprentice is consistently working at, or above, the level set out in the standard, the pre-requisite gateway requirements for EPA have been met and that they can be evidenced to an EPAO. The employer may wish to take advice from the apprentice’s training provider(s).

As a gateway requirement, apprentices must achieve English and mathematics at level 2 prior to taking their EPA. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement the apprenticeships English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3 and a British Sign Language qualification is an alternative to English qualifications for whom this is their primary language.

In addition, they will need to complete a portfolio of evidence to support the professional discussion.

The EPA must be completed within a 3 month period after the apprentice has met the EPA gateway requirements.

EPA must be conducted by an organisation approved to offer services against this standard, as selected by the employer, from the Education & Skills Funding Agency’s (ESFAs) Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations (RoEPAO).

The EPA consists of two distinct assessment methods:
 Practical observation with questions & answers
 Professional discussion supported by a portfolio of evidence.

College Attendance

Apprentices will attend college once every two weeks and will study online materials during allotted time at work on a weekly basis.

Learners will be assessed in their work place. All evidence and written assessments are completed through our online platforms. Learners will receive support from an assessor throughout the duration of the qualification.

Before you proceed to apply for an apprenticeship, please read through the information which relates to your age group below, and then select the correct application button from the menu located further down the page.

Aged between 15 and 18

The application window for joint applications for full-time courses and apprenticeships starting in September 2024 is open from Monday 2nd October.

In order to study an apprenticeship you must have an employer willing to take you on as an apprentice and have an offer of employment in place by September, ready for enrolment.

The information below applies to those:

  • currently in year 11 and looking to study on an apprenticeship upon finishing school
  • currently in year 11 and looking to make a joint full-time and apprenticeship application, so that both options are available to be pursued upon finishing school (although you can apply for both options you will eventually need to choose between a full-time programme or apprenticeship, you cannot do both at the same time)
  • currently in year 12* on a full-time course and looking to find an apprenticeship to start after the end of the summer term

If you are interested in an Apprenticeship but do not yet have a contract of employment from an employer, we strongly advise you to apply for a full-time programme as well so you have a back-up. We will process both your full-time application and apprenticeship application until you inform us that you have secured an employer and have an Apprenticeship contract in place, at which point your apprenticeship application will take priority.

If you do have an employer with an Apprenticeship contract of employment in place, we still strongly advise that you apply for a full-time programme as well so you that you have a back-up in case this falls through.

Once you have read the above please click the red button underneath. Then click the button ’15 – 18 Years – Apply Online’ in the menu underneath this section and you will be taken to the next stage of the application process.

*If you are currently in year 12 and 13, but looking to find an apprenticeship and switch mid-year then please contact our Apprenticeship Admissions Team where they will advise you on suitable vacancies.

If you are unsure about any of the above and would like to speak to our apprenticeships team directly then please contact us using the below:

01206 712043 – Applicant Enquiries or email:

Aged 19+

In order to study an apprenticeship you must have an employer willing to take you on as an apprentice and with an offer of employment in place.

Please read through the information below and follow the information that applies to your current status.

If you have found an employer willing to take you on as an Apprentice and they are ready to put a contract of employment in place, please click the red button located underneath this section, which will take you to the first stage of the application process. Then click the button ’19+ Years – How to Apply’ where you will be taken to the next stage of the application process.

I am already in employment and my employer would like to put me through an apprenticeship

If you are already in employment then please contact our Apprenticeship Admissions Team where they will work with you and your employer to complete the sign-up and enrolment onto the programme.

01206 712043 – Applicant Enquiries or email:

I don’t have an employer

If you do not have a contract offer of employment from an employer in place then there are other options available to you:

Apply for a vacancy

Employers can recruit for apprentice positions all year round. We have apprenticeship vacancies listed on our website throughout the year in a variety of industries and with employers small, medium and large.

View our live vacancies

Join Our Talent Pool

All you have to do is complete and submit our Talent Pool application form, attend a pre-screening assessment/interview and be available when contacted. We will then send your details along with your profile to employers looking for an apprentice, inform you if you are selected for interview, and send you guidance to prepare you for interview.

Join our Talent Pool

If you are unsure about any of the above and would like to speak to our apprenticeships team directly then please contact us using the below:

01206 712043 – Applicant Enquiries or email:

Employer Application Enquiries

If you would be interested to find out more about how this apprenticeship can work for your business or already have a member of staff who this apprenticeship would be perfect for please contact us using the ‘Hire an Apprentice: Enquire Here’ button in the menu below.

Information for Employers

How is my business going to benefit from an Apprentice?

How can I fit this apprentice into my business?

The benefits are that you are going to be able to develop and grow apprentices appropriately to your work place needs, whilst supporting their chosen career path in supporting teaching and learning in schools.

Colchester Institute is here to help support this valuable process in a personalised way, so that we enhance the apprentices learning and contribute to your work place requirements.

What about support in the workplace?

You are required to support the apprentice throughout the duration of their course by providing an appropriate mentor, release time to meet with their assessor in the work place or release time to attend face to face workshops.



Apprenticeships FAQ

How is my business going to benefit from an Apprentice?

Fill your skills gaps: an Apprentice’s training is tailored to your organisation’s needs, resulting in a loyal, motivated work force Increase productivity by developing staff skills and expertise.

Value for money: a cost effective way to attract new talent and fresh eyes into your organisation.

Cost saving: we can advertise your vacancies and recruit the best candidates for your needs.

An industry recognised professional qualification can be built into the course which your apprentice will bring back to the business, providing value for money and a return on investment in their career as well as bringing back up to date knowledge from college.

What is expected of the employer?

When taking on an apprentice, there are certain expectations that must be met by the both the employer and the apprentice. As the employer, you are expected to:

  • Pay the minimum wage for an apprentice
  • Provide a full contract of employment for your apprentice
  • Offer the same benefits package to your apprentice as other employees
  • Arrange for a workplace mentor for your apprentice
  • Deliver a safe working environment
  • Ensure opportunities are made available to allow the learning of new skills and knowledge within the apprentice’s contracted working hours
  • Ensure the apprentice is given opportunities within contracted working hours to develop maths and English skills, where a GCSE grade A-C (or higher) has not been previously attained

What will this cost my business?

Levy paying employers can access levy funds to pay for this programme, and our blended learning model can contribute to the 20% off- the-job training requirement.

The introduction of the Apprenticeship Levy in April 2017 has changed the way that government funds apprenticeships in England. All businesses operating within the UK with a wage bill of over £3million are required to contribute to the Apprenticeship Levy.

  • If the levy applies to your business you will be required to pay 0.5% of your entire wage bill into the levy. This will be offset against a levy allowance worth £15,000 for each tax year.
  • You will only be able to use your levy payment for government backed apprenticeships.
  • Levy payments will expire after 18 months.

Speak to an Advisor at CI Business Solutions on 01206 712727 to make your levy payments work for you.

Non-levy paying employers will need to contribute 5% of the maximum funding band as published by the Skills Funding Agency for the delivery of training and assessment for their apprenticeship.

Levy paying employers will pay the full cost of the agreed funding band using their Digital Apprenticeship account.

Employers with less than 50 employees who are recruiting an apprentice aged 16-18 years old will not be required to pay the contribution fee.

Any associated cost to the individual will be made clear at the interview.

What about support in the workplace?

Skilled and knowledgeable staff must be available to support the apprentice in the workplace.

Does the apprentice have to attend college?

College attendance where required will be communicated post-application and enrolment.

Why should I choose Colchester Institute to support my recruitment and retention?

Colchester Institute is the largest college provider of apprenticeships in Greater Essex. We are experts at connecting the right people, to the right training, to the right business – and when it comes to Apprenticeships, our Apprenticeship Advisors can support your business every step of the way.

As part of our service we can support your business with:

  • Advertising the Apprenticeship vacancy
  • Manage the applications received in line with your individual requirements
  • Match prospective candidates already known to us
  • Conduct initial pre-screening for candidates
  • Carry out visits to your premises alongside regular reviews to support you, your staff and your apprentice
  • Advice on any grants or funding where available

Our team will provide:

  • A fee free recruitment service.
  • Personal 1:1 Apprenticeship Levy advice and guidance.
  • A dedicated Account Manager.
  • Industry experienced, professional, technical trainers.
  • Bespoke programmes available upon request.
  • An Essex priority skills focus.
  • Free employer events.



Off-The-Job Training FAQ

Off-the-Job Training (OJT) is one of the key requirements for all apprenticeship standards.

Apprentices must spend 20% of their contracted working hours undertaking Off-the-Job Training, which is defined as “learning undertaken outside of the normal day-to-day working environment and leads toward the achievement of an apprenticeship.”

Off-the-Job Training must be directly relevant to the apprentice’s programme and teach them new knowledge, skills and behaviours that will help them reach competence in their occupation and ensure that apprentices are actively learning and working to attain the required knowledge and skills within their sector while enrolled in their placement program.

What does Off-the-Job Training Look Like?

Off-the-Job Training must account for at least 20% of an apprentice’s contracted working hours within their full-time employment as an apprentice.

This means that their time might be broken down like the below:

  • 5 x 7 working hours in a day = 35 working hours in a week
  • 52 working weeks in a year x 35 working hours = 1820 total working hours in a year
  • 20% Off-the-Job Training requirement of the 1820 hours = 364 hours dedicated to OJT over the course of the apprenticeship
  • This is also equivalent to the apprentice spending one day per week during their 12-month apprenticeship undertaking Off-the-Job Training

The above depends on their contracted working hours within the day and/or working week, as well as the length of their programme.

For example, Apprentices working more hours in the day and the week, as well as those whose programmes are longer than 12 months in duration, then their Off-the-Job Training requirement will still consist of 20% of their contracted hours but the total number of working hours and total time dedicated to OJT will be different the above.

Why is Off-the-Job Training Conducted within the Apprentice’s Contracted Hours?

An apprenticeship is a work-based programme, and any training that contributes towards an apprentice’s development should be included in their contracted working hours.

The Department for Education (DfE) has said that it would be unreasonable to expect an apprentice to undertake training that is part of their apprenticeship in their own time, therefore if training must take place outside of the apprentice’s working hours, then this should be recognised by both the Employer and Training Provider.

An example of this would be if an apprentice has to attend a 2-hour lecture scheduled after their working hours, then arrangements should be made by the training provider and employer for the apprentice to make up the time by leaving work 2 hours early.

What does Off-the-Job Training Include?

Off-the-Job Training can include a number of activities that can take place on or off the employer’s normal work premises.

If you are unsure of whether an activity can be regarded as Off-the-Job Training, the below questions form a useful point of reference:

  • Is the activity directly relevant to the apprenticeship?
  • Is the activity teaching new knowledge, skills and behaviours?
  • Is the learning taking place in the apprentice’s contracted working hours?

If the answers to the questions are all yes, then this counts as towards OJT. These can include:

The Teaching of Theory

This can include lectures, role playing, simulation exercises, online learning, manufacturer training and so on. Teaching theory should help the apprentice better understand their role, the topics and subjects relevant to their role and their sector in more detail.

Practical Training

This can include shadowing, mentoring, industry visits, attendance at competitions and so on. This training should practically train the apprentice and teach them skills that they can use in their current job or in a future position.

Learning Support

This refers to learning support provided by the Employer or the Training Provider. Some apprentices may require more assistance in their programme to help them reach their best potential. This includes time spent conducting projects, writing assignments and so on.

Learning support counts towards OJT to ensure that all individuals have the support needed and that all barriers to education and training are removed. This could include:

  • physical adjustments
  • access to accessibility software
  • additional revision classes
  • personal support from their Training Provider.

Time spent on assignments is also included in OJT as new knowledge, skills and behaviours can be developed while completing them.

While OJT takes place outside of normal working duties, it is possible to undergo OJT at the apprentice’s workstation. For example, OJT could include learning to use a new machine or undertaking e-learning. While conducting this training, normal working duties should not be required of the apprentice.

Off-the-Job Training can also take place at home via distance learning. If there is a program of study that the apprentice can complete online that contributes to the completion of their apprenticeship, as long as the learning package is included as part of a blended learning programme, this can be counted as an OJT activity.

The activity that the apprentice undertakes is the main focus of OJT. As long as the OJT activity actively contributes to the completion of the apprenticeship, the location matters less than the activity itself.

Essentially OJT is Employers or Training Providers setting aside time for the apprentice to improve themselves, their knowledge and/or their skills.

Off-the-Job Training cannot include:

  • Enrolment
  • Induction, including any basic safety, compliance or diversity training
  • Training to acquire knowledge, skills and behaviours that are not required in the standard or framework
  • Progress reviews or on-programme assessment needed for an apprenticeship framework or standard
  • Training which takes place outside the apprentice’s working hours*
  • English and maths (up to level 2) which is funded separately
  • Time spent on compulsory activities in the apprenticeship, including time spent on English and Maths qualifications

(*although, as mentioned before, there are exceptions if this time is made up within their working hours)

The government acknowledges that apprentices will inevitably want to spend time outside of working hours to familiarise themselves with their work. However, any personal initiative shown by the apprentice will not count towards Off-the-Job Training.

Any time that an apprentice takes to conduct OJT is counted towards their normal working hours. That means that if an apprentice is interested in undertaking training outside of their working hours, they should ask their Employer and Training Provider first and see if arrangements can be made to accommodate this.

Preparing for Off-the-Job Training?

It is the responsibility of the Employer and Training Provider to ensure that the apprentice spends 20% of their apprenticeship undertaking Off-the-Job Training. Completion of OJT must be documented and evidenced in order for the apprentice to complete the apprenticeship.

In order to comply with the funding rules, each apprentice should receive a commitment statement from the Employer/Training Provider outlining the program of training the apprentice will receive and how the Employer/Training Provider intends to spend the Off-the-Job Training time. The recipient of ESFA funding (usually the main provider) should keep, update and maintain the relevant files.

The ESFA will remain flexible about the type of evidence that should be retained and provided. They want Training Providers and Employers to use naturally occurring evidence where it is available. Many Training Providers have their own systems of collecting and storing evidence. Some examples of naturally occurring evidence might include:

  • Apprentice timesheets
  • Training logs
  • Registers
  • HR training systems

For more details and examples on how to proceed with Off-the-Job Training, you can click here to see the full OJT document from the Education and Skills Funding Agency.



Funding and Financial Support FAQ

What will this cost my Business?

Non-levy paying employers will need to contribute 5% of the maximum funding band as published by the Skills Funding Agency for the delivery of training and assessment for their apprenticeship. Levy paying employers will pay the full cost of the agreed funding band using their Digital Apprenticeship account.

Apprenticeship Funding Bands

Apprenticeship Funding Bands
Employers with less than 50 employees who are recruiting an apprentice aged 16-18 years old will not be required to pay the contribution fee. Any associated cost to the individual will be made clear at the interview.


How is the Apprenticeship funded?

Full government funding is available for an apprentice aged between 16-18 years old and where the employer employs less than 50 employees. Full funding is also available for apprentices aged 19 to 24 who have either been in care or has an education health care plan.

An employer contribution fee will be required for:

  • Non-levy paying employers recruiting an apprentice aged 19 or over
  • Non-levy paying employers who employ more than 50 employees and recruit a 16-18 year old apprentice

Payment plans and schedules  can be discussed with our apprenticeship Account Managers prior to signing contracts. For more information about apprenticeship contribution fees please contact one of our Apprenticeship Advisers on 01206 712043.

Apprentice Minimum Wage

A National Minimum Wage for apprentices was introduced on 1 October 2010. The wage applies to all apprentices aged under 19; and apprentices aged 19 or over in the first year of their Apprenticeship.

As of April 1st 2023 the national minimum wage for apprentices is £5.28 an hour and applies to time working, plus time spent training that is part of the Apprenticeship. This rate applies to apprentices under 19 and those aged 19 or over who are in their first year. Apprentices must be paid at least the national minimum wage rate if they’re an apprentice aged 19 or over and have completed their first year.

Employers are free to pay above the new wage and many do so, but employers must ensure that they are paying their apprentices at least the minimum wage. If an apprentice is on a higher wage, the employer must continue to pay that for the remainder of the training or until the apprentice becomes eligible for the full national minimum wage.

You must be at least:

  • school leaving age to get the National Minimum Wage
  • aged 23 to get the National Living Wage – the minimum wage will still apply for workers aged 22 and under

Current rates

These rates are for the National Living Wage (for those aged 23 and over) and the National Minimum Wage (for those of at least school leaving age). The rates change on 1 April every year.

 23 and over21 to 2218 to 20Under 18Apprentice
April 2023£10.42£10.18£7.49£5.28£5.28

Apprentices

Apprentices are entitled to the apprentice rate if they’re either:

  • aged under 19
  • aged 19 or over and in the first year of their apprenticeship

Example: An apprentice aged 21 in the first year of their apprenticeship is entitled to a minimum hourly rate of £5.28.

Apprentices are entitled to the minimum wage for their age if they both:

  • are aged 19 or over
  • have completed the first year of their apprenticeship

Example: An apprentice aged 21 who has completed the first year of their apprenticeship is entitled to a minimum hourly rate of £10.18

Previous rates

The following rates were for the National Living Wage (previously for those aged 25 and over) and the National Minimum Wage (for those of at least school leaving age) from April 2016.

From 1st April 2021 the National Living Wage was extended to 23 and 24 year olds.

Financial Information and Support

Government support

Employers are not required to pay Class 1 National Insurance contributions for an apprentice, if the apprentice:

  • is under 25 years old
  • is on an approved UK government apprenticeship standard or framework (these can differ depending on UK country)
  • earns less than £967 a week (£50,270 a year)

Employers with fewer than 50 people working for them will be able to train 16-18-year-old apprentices without making a contribution towards the costs of training. The government will pay 100% of the training costs for these individuals.

Funding

The government will pay employers, no matter what size, £1,000 for each 16-18 year old apprentice they employ.

Eligibility 

All employers are eligible for a £1,000 payment for taking on an apprentice who is either:

  • aged 16 to 18 years old
  • under 25 and has an education, health and care plan or has been in the care of their local authority

This £1000 payment will be paid to your training provider and you will receive it from them.

When you’ll get paid

We’ll send the payment in 2 equal instalments for each apprentice.

To be eligible, your apprentice must complete:

  • 90 days of their apprenticeship for your first payment
  • 365 days of their apprenticeship for your second payment

Once the apprenticeship information has been checked, we will process the payments.

Payments will be made on the 14th working day of the month, it can take up to 3 days for the payments to reach your account.

You can track when your payments are due to be paid on your view applications page.

We cannot send any payments until we’ve received and verified the organisation and finance details. This could take up to 80 days.

The apprenticeship levy
The levy was introduced on 6 April 2017 and is charged at a rate of 0.5% of an employers’ pay bill, paid through PAYE on a monthly basis.

Each employer has a levy allowance of £15,000, this is not a cash payment. It works in a similar way to the personal tax allowance and cannot be used to purchase apprenticeship training.

The impact of the allowance means that fewer than 1.3% of UK employers, those with an annual pay bill of more than £3 million, are liable to pay the levy. Employers in England who pay the levy
will be able to get out more than they pay in, through a 10% top-up to their online accounts.

An employer’s pay bill is made up of the total amount of the employees’ earnings that are subject to Class 1 National Insurance contributions, such as:

– wages
– bonuses
– commissions
– pension contributions

What about non-levy paying employers?

Employers with a pay bill of less than £3 million a year will not need to pay the levy.

At least 90% of non-levy paying employers’ apprenticeship training and assessment costs in England will be paid for by the government. The government will ask these employers to make a 5% contribution to the cost, paid directly to the provider, and the government covers the rest. This cost will be spread over the lifetime of the apprenticeship.

The government is offering additional support to organisations with fewer than 50 employees* by paying 100% of training and assessment costs for their apprentices aged 16-18 and for those aged 19-24 formerly in care or with a local authority education, health and care plan.




Apprenticeships - Parent's FAQ

As a parent, you want the best for your children and that often means helping them to make the right decisions regarding their future (including what to do after school/college). There are a lot of options for school leavers and with such a competitive job market, a professional apprenticeship could be the right answer to ensure your son/daughter secures a career well-suited to their specific wants/needs.

Colchester Institute is the largest college provider of apprenticeships in Greater Essex and can boast achievement rates higher than national averages. This section aims to provide answers to some of the most commonly asked questions we get from parents and carers about apprenticeships.

Apprenticeships give your child the chance to work towards a fully paid qualification from Level 3 (A level equivalent) to a university degree whilst training for a high skilled job. Plans to introduce more Higher Apprenticeship routes will provide learners with a real choice between work-based and traditional degree education.

The Facts

  • The apprenticeship is designed by employers giving apprentices the skills directly relevant to the job role
  • Apprentices study for around one day a week, or in a block. Some apprentices do not attend college and complete learning through our online platforms
  • Courses can last from 1 year to 6 years if completing a degree apprenticeship
  • All tuitions fees are paid by the government and the employer
  • Apprentices are becoming the future leaders
  • Employers are looking for initiative and enthusiasm as well as grades
  • Apprentices will learn the skills employers look for but say that graduates seeking employment don’t always have:
  • Creativity, Communication, Problem Solving, Project Management and Team Work
  • 90% of apprentices stay in work when they finish
  • 71% of apprentices remain with the same employer
  • 83% of parents say they would do a degree apprenticeship themselves if they could wind back the clock
  • Apprentices must be employed for between 16 and 40 hours per week

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a job, with formal training that will enable your son or daughter to earn nationally-recognised qualifications whilst earning a wage Experience is the key to a great career and by putting the job at the heart of what an apprentice learns, we ensure that they learn the skills that employers really needs them to have.

As of April 1st 2023 the national minimum wage for apprentices is £5.28 an hour and applies to time working, plus time spent training that is part of the Apprenticeship. This rate applies to apprentices under 19 and those aged 19 or over who are in their first year. Apprentices must be paid at least the national minimum wage rate if they’re an apprentice aged 19 or over and have completed their first year.

Employers are free to pay above the new wage and many do so, but employers must ensure that they are paying their apprentices at least the minimum wage. If an apprentice is on a higher wage, the employer must continue to pay that for the remainder of the training or until the apprentice becomes eligible for the full national minimum wage.

Government funding is available to cover the cost of most apprenticeships, which means your son/daughter will not have to pay for any of their training – they will be debt free! Our apprenticeships last between one and six years (depending on which programme the apprentice chooses) and we provide progression routes from GCSE all the way to degree and MSc level qualifications with our own University Centre Colchester.

Will I lose any of my benefit entitlements if my child commences an apprenticeship?

Tax credits will not be affected by your child entering on to an apprenticeship; however, child benefit payments will stop once your child reaches 16 years old and officially leaves school year 11 and enters employment to commence the apprenticeship.


Teaching Assistant Level 3 Apprenticeship
Course Outline: Designed for learning support staff with a working role which requires competence in a specialist area

If you are ready to make an application then please select the correct application button from the menu below.

LevelLevel 3
LocationColchester
DurationThe course can be achieved in 12-18 months
Campus / Adult Skills CentreColchester Campus
Apprenticeship Funding Band (Levy paying employers)£7,000
Employer Contribution Fee (Non-levy paying employers)£350

Disclaimer

All fees, prices and funding information shown on this page are for courses starting in the 2023-24 academic year unless stated otherwise, and are correct at the time of entering/printing information, however these may be subject to change due to factors outside of our control. The College cannot accept legal or financial liability as a result of any such changes.

Courses fees are generally not confirmed for September until June / July due to the above factors.

The course information describes programmes offered by Colchester Institute. The College takes all reasonable steps to provide courses as described, but cannot guarantee provision. The information is for guidance and does not form any part of a contract.

The College reserves the right to update and amend information as and when necessary. Colchester Institute will do its best to provide the courses shown, but may have to modify or withdraw a course depending on customer demand and other factors.