BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling

Welcome to Person-Centred Counselling

The course will provide you with a range of opportunities to learn about yourself and develop the skills to become a fully qualified, BACP registered, Person-Centred Counsellor. A strong theoretical knowledge base, together with year one skills practice will prepare you for supervised counselling hours in your second year of training. Students experience a psychologically demanding programme which will challenge their world view.

Teaching staff are all qualified counsellors and practice within a range of therapeutic environments. The course is accredited by the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy and has been for over twenty years. Our graduates progress in to careers as counsellors or working in the allied professions. Some graduates move on to completing their masters in Psychology and Counselling.

‘The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change’.
(Carl Rogers 1961)

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Course IntroductionModulesEntry RequirementsGraduate CareersAdditional

The BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling is a professional training in humanistic person-centred counselling / psychotherapy. This course is designed for those who have an interest in mental health, the human condition and a willingness to work with others in times of significant distress.

The course will involve a comprehensive study of Carl Rogers’ theory and practice contextualised in a range of key paradigms. Students have the opportunity to work with clients through the counselling service, clinical supervision is provided. The BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling is not accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) however the BACP Framework for Ethical practice is embedded throughout the course. In order to have been considered to have completed an accredited course candidates will need to have first completed the BACP accredited DipHe in Person-centred Counselling at Colchester Institute in year 1 and 2.

Delivery is through a range of methods including lectures, seminars, case-study, discussions and workshops. A variety of assessment strategies will be used including assignments, case studies, work-based projects, patchwork texts and extended research study/dissertation.

The course operates on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Most modules count for 15 academic credits, with each credit taken equating to a total study time of around 10 hours, which includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity.

Full-time students take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. A total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits are needed for an honours degree as a whole. Overall grades for the course and degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.

Each module is worth a specified number of credits: you take a combination of compulsory and optional modules, enabling you to cover key subject knowledge while developing your own interests. The number of optional modules you can take depends on the number of core modules at a given level. Our teaching is informed by research, professional practice and industry engagement and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline.

Course Structure Year One (Level 4) Year Two (Level 5) Year Three (Level 6) Assessment

BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling

  • 48 UCAS points* achieved through two subjects at A Level, 5 GCSEs (grades A*-C) (preferably including English) or an equivalent qualification (e.g. NVQ Health and Social Care Level 3 or BTEC Diploma in Health and Social Care (12 units) or Access to Higher Education qualification (to include psychology or sociology and English).
  • It is desirable that applicants have previously completed an introductory counselling course and have used these skills in a helping capacity.
  • Two sound references.
  • All applicants must undergo an extended interview process. Note: Applicants who have successfully achieved the counselling diploma at University Centre Colchester (or equivalent) may be considered for entry to the third year of this programme. However those who have not completed the University Centre Colchester Diploma will not be able to claim graduation from and accredited course, unless their previous course is accredited.
  • Satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)** enhanced check.

DipHE Person-Centred Counselling

  • 32 UCAS points*
  • Relevant work experience.
  • Able to demonstrate a capacity for self-awareness, maturity and stability and be able to cope with the emotional demands of the programme.
  • Two satisfactory references required.
  • Attendance at an extended Interview.
  • Satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)** enhanced check.
  • Access to Higher Education qualification (to include psychology or sociology and English) also accepted.

*2017-18 UCAS Tariff
**Please note there is a charge of £44 for a DBS check.

International applicants

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking), or an equivalent English Language qualification.

Additional requirements:

  • You must provide evidence of having been in general education for at least 10 years and of having studied within the last five years
  • a face-to-face interview is required before an offer is made.

DipHE Person-Centred Counselling

This qualification is useful for those who work in or wish to work in the health and social care professions; private counselling practice. Opportunities exist for progression to the BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling. This qualification will enable professional students in counselling to provide evidence of continuing professional development and undertake broader managerial and/or supervision duties.

BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling

Some graduates find employment within the NHS as part of the IAPT (improving access to psychological therapy) programme; others set up in private practice or work for voluntary organisations. It should be borne in mind that counselling/psychotherapy is not a full-time activity and that most therapists work part-time or have other occupations in allied sectors.

Career Opportunities

This qualification will enable professional students in counselling to provide evidence of continuing professional development and undertake broader managerial and/or supervision duties.

Course Progression

Further academic opportunities such as the MSc in Counselling Studies, available at the University of Essex.

Timetables: Timetables are normally available one month before registration. Please note that while we make every effort to ensure that timetables are as student friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week. Part-time classes are normally scheduled on one or two days per week.

Teaching and Learning: You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical’s. Seminars enable smaller group discussions to develop understanding of topics covered in lectures. You will use and have access to industry-standard software and facilities throughout your course.

When not attending lectures, seminars and laboratory or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the library, learning zone or technical learning resources, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations

Assessment: The course provides you with opportunities to test your understanding of the subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally contains at least one piece of practice or ‘formative’ assessment for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark.

There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. Assessment methods include written examinations and a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations and your final year major project. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

 Feedback: You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

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BA (Hons) Person-Centred Counselling - Full-time
LevelLevel 6
LocationColchester
Duration3 Years
UCAS CodeBA (Hons) B940 | DipHE B941
Academic Year2018-2019
Study ModeFull-Time
CampusUniversity Centre Colchester
Start DateSeptember 2018
Fee(s)2018-19: £9,250 per year
Course Structure

Although designed as a three year full-time degree programme, there are three named routes into the qualification. The Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE) allows for study of the first year of the programme. The Diploma of Higher Education (Dip HE) allows for study of the first two years of the programme and the BA (Hons) route allows students to study the full qualification.

Both the CertHE and the DipHE can be used as a stepping stones towards an Honours Degree with progression allowed following successful completion of each stage.

The DipHE is made up of two levels over 2 years: the Certificate in Higher Education which is studied in year one, and the Diploma which is studied in year two. College-based learning makes up much of the programme and, in addition, clinical work and supervision are arranged on an individual basis, and take place on a non-college day. Successful completion of the complete programme leads to the award of a Diploma of Higher Education: Person-centred Counselling (accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy). The Counselling Education Programme focuses on the humanistic person-centred approach. All students will be expected to embark on personal counselling or psychotherapy at their own expense for a minimum of 10 hours per academic year.

The first year focuses on person-centred theory and practice in-depth with taught elements, seminars, tutorial and personal development groups. The use of role play is a significant part of the programme. By the second year students are working with clients under supervision and deepening their grasp of theory and practice. Different therapeutic modalities are studied and commonalities as well as significant differences explicated and critiqued. By the third year, students will be aiming to complete their work with clients and extend their effective use of supervision. A research project of students’ own choosing is an important part of this final year. All students will be expected to embark on personal counselling or psychotherapy at their own expense for a minimum of 10 hours per academic year.

Year One (Level 4)

Module Title

Equality and Diversity (15 credits)

What’s it about?

You will gain a working knowledge of how counsellors can address equality and diversity in counselling practice.

What do I learn?

In an increasingly diverse world, being aware of difference and diversity within counselling practice is extremely important.  You will explore working with Equality Law, anti-discriminatory practice and issues around gender and the personal and professional challenges this can bring.

What’s the assignment?

You will be presenting your own personal reflections in a 20-minute presentation about difference and diversity within counselling practice.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Exploring Clients’ Lives (15 credits)

What’s it about?

You will be taken through the life course of an individual, incorporating sociological concepts along the way.  This will enable you to have wider understanding of the issues facing diverse client groups and a diverse society.

What do I learn?

You will explore how sociological concepts such as family, education and work may have an impact on a client’s life and the direction of their life course.  You will consider fundamental sociological perspectives and their application to individual experiences and society as a whole.  You will consider your own life course and how this may relate to your professional practice.

What’s the assignment?

You will be asked to undertake an interview with an adult where the information you obtain can be used to apply sociological concepts to the life course of the individual.  This will be in the form of a 3,000-word case study.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Fitness to Practice 1 (30 Credits.)

What’s it about?

In this module, you will learn to develop your study skills and your understanding of the BACP Ethical Framework. You will undertake personal and professional (PPD) groups to help you further develop your understanding of yourself and others, as well as undertaking your own personal therapy with a qualified counsellor.

What do I learn?

 Throughout this module, you will learn to apply the BACP Ethical Framework to your future practice and develop skills in studying, writing and referencing. You will learn to observe how you interact with others and what things ‘press your buttons’,as your self-awareness continues to develop.

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed through a variety of tasks including a learning journal, a presentation about yourself, a critical analysis of PPD groups and a log of your personal therapy.

To see the module description, please click here.

Introduction to Counselling Practice (30 credits)

What’s it about?

You will be introduced to skills in counselling in relation to the person-centred approach and learn to facilitate a therapeutic encounter.

What do I learn?

You will learn to relate and apply person-centred theory to counselling practice. Particular focus is given to Carl Rogers’ “6 necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic change”. This is taught through tutor presentation, film and group discussion. You will also learn how to give and receive feedback from your peers and be supported as a reflective practitioner. The aim for you is to develop a therapeutic “way of being”, preparing you for client work in the second year.

What’s the assignment?

 You will complete an introductory essay, transcript and analysis of a role play with a peer, 14 role play counselling sessions, and a statement of readiness to practice.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Person-Centred Theory (30 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module provides you with an active understanding of Person-centred Theory and the psychological processes involved.

What do I learn?

You will be learning all about the Person-centred approach to counselling, and how theory relates to practice. You will also be able to explore potential clients experiences as well as your own, through developing understanding of humanistic philosophy and principles.

What’s the assignment?

 There are two 3,000-word assignments which consist of an academic essay and a written case study.

Want to know more?

 To see the module description, please click here.

Year Two (Level 5)

Comparative approaches (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

 Working with people requires different ways of understanding and philosophy. In this module, you will learn to develop your understanding of person-centred counselling and how to compare and contrast this modality to others in counselling and psychotherapy.

What do I learn?

During this module, you will learn the fundamental principles and philosophies of different schools of thought and how to communicate with peers trained in other modalities

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed by a written essay comparing and contrasting the person centred tradition with that of another philosophy.

To see the module description, please click here.

Fitness to Practice 2 (30 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module is an extension of Fitness to Practice 1. In this module you will learn to further develop your study skills and your understanding of the ethical framework. You will undertake personal and professional (PPD) groups to help you further develop your understanding of yourself which you have gained through your personal therapy and your interaction in groups.

What do I learn?

Throughout this module you will learn to apply the ethical framework to your practice. You will develop further study skills, and you will learn to observe and monitor how you interact with others and what things ‘press your buttons’.

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed through a variety of assessments including a learning journal, a presentation about yourself, a report on private and agency practice, and a log of your personal therapy and supervised counselling hours.

To see the module description, please click here.

Introduction to Mental Health (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module covers the diverse area of mental health including current health care and counselling practice. You will be able to explore the historical, social and political dimensions that inform mental health practice and the differing concepts of psychological well-being.

What do I learn?

You will be learning all about the many models of mental health and how different theories inform practice. You will also be studying the origins of mental health and the role society plays in shaping our understanding of what mental ill-health is.

What’s the assignment?

There is one assignment, in which you will produce a written paper (3,000 words) on the differing perspectives of mental healthcare using a case study.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Professional Practice (30 credits)

What’s it about?

You will be developing your knowledge of person-centred counselling and the humanistic view of working with individual client issues. Further consideration and critique of Rogers’ ‘Six necessary and sufficient conditions’ will provide a foundation to this module.

What do I learn?

You will be applying person-centred theoretical concepts to practice and real client work. You will also develop practice with an awareness of how this approach “fits” and is communicated within different working environments. Further consideration of the client/counsellor relationship will continue to underpin all teaching.

What’s the assignment?

There is a 6,000 word analysis, based on a 50-minute recording and a transcript of a real client session.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Professional Supervision (15 credits)

What’s it about?

You will be introduced to counselling supervision and how it supports practice and client work.

What do I learn?

You will learn about reflective practice and how this relates to supervision in the counselling professions. You will also be introduced to the functions of supervision and a range of theoretical models that underpin the supervisory process.

What’s the assignment?

There is a 3,000 word essay, requiring you to reflect on your own experience of supervision, applying theoretical concepts of reflective practice and modules of supervision.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Research Appreciation 15 Credits.

What’s it about?

 As counselling progresses, the need for research and proven efficacy becomes imperative. This module is designed to give you an appreciation of research and its role in developing professional knowledge and understanding.

What do I learn?

You will learn the different processes of research, the terminology of research, and learn how to develop a critical appreciation and awareness of research findings.

What’s the assignment?

The assignment is a critique of a research paper.

To see the module description, please click here.

Year Three (Level 6)

Creative Techniques (15 credits)

What’s it about?

You will be introduced to various creative techniques which can be used with clients to offer you the opportunity to develop and expand your counselling practice within a person-centred framework.

What do I learn?

You will be able to get involved, working experientially, with techniques such as sand tray, guided imagery, creative writing and working with metaphors.

What’s the assignment?

You will be comparing and contrasting creative techniques for self-discovery with a traditional person- centred approach (3,000 words).

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Fitness to Practice 3 (30 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module is an extension of Fitness to Practice 2.

You will continue to develop your employability and study skills.  At this stage of your study you will consolidate and develop an independent working knowledge and understanding of the BACP Ethical Framework.

What do I learn?

Throughout this module you will continue to apply the ethical framework to your practice, by considering and reflecting on diverse ethical dilemmas.  You will consider your counselling practice in preparation for completing the course and consider what your career will look like post-graduation.

You will undertake a personal and professional (PPD) group to help you further develop your understanding of yourself and your interactions with others, which will consolidate your awareness gained through personal therapy.

What’s the assignment?

You will be completing four assessments including a (20 minute) presentation reflecting on self-awareness gained from years 1 to 3, a Funding Bid (2,000 words), and an Insurance Report (2000 words). In addition, you also have to submit a log of your personal therapy, a supervision report, and client and supervision hours gained throughout out your counselling practice.

 To see the module description, please click here.

Professional development through research (30 Credits.)

What’s it about?

This module is the capstone of your undergraduate career. You will finalise your studies with a literature review or undergraduate project concentrating on your research and professional interests.

What do I learn?

In this module, you will develop the skills you learnt in research appreciation and learn how to undertake a literature review or extended essay critically reviewing the available literature in your chosen field.

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed through a substantial literature review, extended essay, or dissertation.

To see the module description, please click here.

Loss and Bereavement (15  Credits)

What’s it about?

A sad reality is that a great deal of counselling work incorporates work around loss and/or bereavement. The module looks at the complexities of working with loss and bereavement, the sensitivities required, and your personal response to loss.

What do I learn?

During this module, you will be introduced to various models designed to understand and work with loss and bereavement. Theorist studies will include Stroebe and Schut, Worden, Kubler Ross and Freud.

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed through 2 assignments looking at personal responses to grief and a critical analysis of some of the models designed to understand and work with loss.

To see the module description, please click here.

Working with Children and Young people.  30 Credits.

 What’s it about?

This module is designed to explore the development of children and young people. This promotes the work and professionalism of counsellors working with this client group.

What do I learn?

During this module you will be provided with an introduction to cognitive and emotional development of young people and the impact of early trauma and attachment on the individual. Knowledge of the Children’s Act, confidentiality, including Fraser Guidelines, will be covered as communicated in the BACP Guidelines of working with children & young people.

What’s the assignment?

This module is assessed by a small written exam, a presentation, a case study and finally a critique of working with children and young people.

To see the module description, please click here.

Assessment
  • Types of assessments: Essays, Presentations, Exam, Viva, Transcript, Supervision reports, Client hour log sheets, Literature review (not exclusive).
  • Each module is assessed by the module tutor and internally verified by another member of staff.
  • All marking guidance follows University of Essex procedures which is available through essex.ac.uk.
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All Fees and prices shown on the website are for courses starting in the 2017-18 academic year and correct at the time of entering/printing information, however these may be subject to change. The College cannot accept legal or financial liability as a result of any such changes. Fees for courses starting in the 2018-19 academic year will be added to the website from June 2018.

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