HNC/D Mechanical Engineering

Welcome to Mechanical Engineering

This qualification is highly regarded by local employers; it will offer students a broad understanding of the typical tasks and requirements of engineering professionals.

Our industry recognised qualification enables you to build skills currently in high demand by employers, alongside opportunities to further enhance your knowledge through site visits and and attending talks by guest speakers.

For those who have appropriate experience of working within this sector the programme is offered as part-time study over four years. The part-time Mechanical Engineering programme will allow you to fit other commitments around your study time.

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Course IntroductionModulesEntry RequirementsGraduate CareersAdditional

This programme is an industry recognised qualification that builds skills currently in high demand by employers. It provides access to exciting opportunities within a challenging and rewarding sector with fantastic career paths and many job prospects both locally, nationally and even internationally.

This programme enables you to extend your expereince in mechanical engineering and problem solving techniques and gain the industry recognised higher technician qualification. The programme is suitable for those who have an interest in advanced engineering or manufacturing.

The course, comprising eight modules (HNC) and a further eight (HND), covers the fundamental engineering concepts and skills required of a higher technician as well as providing a sound basis for further study at degree level. As with all engineering day release programmes, individual modules may be studied separately to update knowledge. The course is delivered through a mixture of classroom activity, guided assignment work and examinations. Emphasis is placed on problem solving skills and students should expect the delivery to reflect this combined with associated mathematical concepts.

For those who have appropriate experience of working within this sector the programme is also offered as part-time study over four years. The part-time Mechanical Engineering programme will allow you to fit other commitments around your study time but will include the same modules as the full-time course.

Undergraduate courses operate on a modular basis that provides flexibility and choice. Each module is worth a specified number of credits, with most modules counting for 30/40 or 15/20 academic credits (depending on the programme), with each credit taken equating to a total amount of study time which includes scheduled teaching, independent study and assessment activity.

Most full-time students will take modules worth 60 credits per semester, with part-time students taking proportionately fewer credits per semester. A total of 120 credits per level and 360 credits are needed for an honours degree as a whole. Overall grades for the course and degree classification are based on the marks obtained for modules taken at levels 5 and 6.

Our teaching is informed by research, professional practice and industry engagement and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the discipline.

HNC Mechanical Engineering Modules HND Mechanical Engineering Modules

Level 3 Diploma or Extended Diploma or 2 A Levels in relevant subjects, or level 3 qualifications in maths and science or equivalent. Industrial experience may also be considered.

*UCAS Tariff points where shown, are for entry on to higher education programmes starting from September 2021.

International applicants

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking), or an equivalent English Language qualification.

Additional requirements for International Students:

  • You must provide evidence of having been in general education for at least 10 years and of having studied within the last five years
  • a face-to-face interview is required before an offer is made.

Our graduates either begin an exciting career in the workplace within this high-tech industry or/and continue to the HND Diploma in Mechanical Engineering or other professional development degree level programmes, either full or part-time. Graduates of the part-time HNC/D programme typically use this qualification to increase promotional career opportunities within their sector. This course should enable a technician to carry out responsible duties consistent with higher technician status.

Timetables: Timetables are normally available one month before registration. Please note that while we make every effort to ensure that timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week. Part-time classes are normally scheduled on one or two days per week.

Teaching and Learning: You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and practicals. Seminars enable smaller group discussions to develop understanding of topics covered in lectures.

When not attending lectures, seminars and practicals or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-directed study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the library, learning zone or technical learning resources, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations

Assessment: The course provides you with opportunities to test your understanding of the subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Each module normally contains at least one piece of practice or ‘formative’ assessment for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark.

There is a formal or ‘summative’ assessment at the end of each module. Assessment methods include written examinations and a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations and your final year major project. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

 Feedback: You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

ApplyPart-Time
HNC Mechanical Engineering Part-time
LevelLevel 4
LocationColchester
Duration18 months (3 semesters) – HNC’s start in September and then run until the February of the following academic year
Course CodeZU5HCMEP01
Academic Year2021-2022
Study ModePart-Time
CampusUniversity Centre Colchester
Start DateSeptember 2021
Fee(s)2020-21: £6,165 for the 3 semesters of study
Awarding/Validation BodyPearson
HND Mechanical Engineering Part-time
LevelLevel 5
LocationColchester
Duration18 months (3 semesters) – HND’s start in February and then run until the end of the following academic year
Course CodeZU5HDMEP01
Academic Year2020-2021
Study ModePart-Time
CampusUniversity Centre Colchester
Start DateFebruary 2021
Fee(s)2020-21: £6,165 for the 3 semesters of study
Awarding/Validation BodyPearson
HNC Mechanical Engineering Modules

HNC in Engineering (Mechanical)

Year One (Level 4)

Module Code and Title:

K/615/1475 – Unit 1: Engineering Design (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the methodical steps that engineers use in creating functional products and processes; from a design brief to the work, and the stages involved in identifying and justifying a solution to a given engineering need.

What do I learn?
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to prepare an engineering design specification that satisfies stakeholders’ requirements, implement best practice when analysing and evaluating possible design solutions, prepare a written technical design report, and present their finalised design to a customer or audience.

What’s the assignment?
There are three parts to submit. One is to prepare an engineering design specification to a client’s brief, the second is to produce a report detailing designs and calculations and the third is a presentation to an invited audience.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

M/615/1476 – Unit 2: Engineering Maths (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is to develop students’ skills in the mathematical principles and theories that underpin the engineering curriculum.

What do I learn?
Students will be introduced to mathematical methods and statistical techniques in order to analyse and solve problems within an engineering context.

What’s the assignment?
There will be four assignments, each relating to an aspect of engineering mathematics

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

T/615/1477 – Unit 3: Engineering Science (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
This unit introduces students to the fundamental laws and applications of the physical sciences within engineering and how to apply this knowledge to find solutions to a variety of engineering problems.

What do I learn?
Among the topics included in this unit are: international system of units, interpreting data, static and dynamic forces, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, material properties and failure, and A.C./D.C. circuit theories.

What’s the assignment?
There will be four assignments, each based on an element of the engineering science unit content, including mechanical engineering systems, characteristics and properties of engineering materials and applications of electromagnetic principles and properties.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

A/615/1478 – Unit 4: Managing a Professional Engineering Project (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
This unit introduces students to the techniques and best practices required to successfully create and manage an engineering project designed to identify a solution to an engineering need. While carrying out this project, students will consider the role and function of engineering in our society, the professional duties and responsibilities expected of engineers together with the behaviours that accompany their actions.

What do I learn?
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to conceive, plan, develop and execute a successful engineering project, and produce and present a project report outlining and reflecting on the outcomes of each of the project processes and stages.

What’s the assignment?
This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. The project brief will be set by the centre, based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The theme and chosen project within the theme will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of professional engineering. Students will undertake this project individually.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

F/615/1482 – Unit 8: Mechanical Principles (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the essential mechanical principles associated with engineering applications.

What do I learn?
Topics included in this unit are: behavioural characteristics of static, dynamic and oscillating engineering systems including shear forces, bending moments, torsion, linear and angular acceleration, conservation of energy and vibrating systems; and the movement and transfer of energy by considering parameters of mechanical power transmission systems.

What’s the assignment?
There will be four assessments to complete, all based on mathematical applications of mechanical principles applied to engineering scenarios.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

K/615/1489 – Unit 15: Automation, Robotics and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is for students to investigate how Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and industrial robots can be programmed to successfully implement automated engineering solutions.

What do I learn?
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to program PLCs and robotic manipulators to achieve a set task, describe the types and uses of PLCs and robots available, write simple PLC programs, and program industrial robots with straightforward commands and safety factors.

What’s the assignment?
There will be two assessments to complete, based on the design and operational characteristics of a PLC system and the design and safe operation of a robot within an industrial application.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here

D/615/1487 – Unit 13: Fundamentals of Thermodynamics and Heat Engines (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
Thermodynamics is the study of the dynamics and behaviour of energy and its manifestations.

What do I learn?
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to investigate fundamental thermodynamic systems and their properties, apply the steady flow energy equation to plant equipment, examine the principles of heat transfer to industrial applications, and determine the performance of internal combustion engines.

What’s the assignment?
There will be two assignments. The first assignment will be concerned with identifying the fundamental thermodynamic systems and the application of the Steady Flow energy Equation to plant equipment. The second will look at the principles of heat transfer and the performance of internal combustion engines. 

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

M/615/1395 – Unit 15: Automation, Robotics and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is for students to investigate how Programmable Logic Controllers

(PLCs) and industrial robots can be programmed to successfully implement automated engineering solutions. Among the topics included in this unit are: PLC system operational characteristics, different types of programming languages, types of robots and cell safety features.

What do I learn?
On successful completion of this unit students will be able to program PLCs and robotic manipulators to achieve a set task, describe the types and uses of PLCs and robots available, write simple PLC programs, and program industrial robots with straightforward commands and safety factors.

What’s the assignment?
There will be two assignments. The first assignment will involve an investigation into the operating characteristics of a PLC system and will require you to design a simple PLC programme. The second will ask you to describe the key elements of industrial robots and investigate the safe operation of an industrial robot.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

J/615/1497 – Unit 23: Computer Aided Design and Manufacture (CAD/CAM) (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

This unit introduces students to all the stages of the CAD/CAM process and to the process of modelling components using CAD software specifically suitable for transferring to CAM software.

What do I learn?

Among the topics included in this unit are: programming methods, component set-up, tooling, solid modelling, geometry manipulation, component drawing, importing solid model, manufacturing simulation, data transfer, CNC machine types and inspections.

What’s the assignment?

The assignments will be split into a written explanation of CAD/CAM principles of manufacturing and the production of 3 solid models for transfer onto a CAM system. There will also be an opportunity to design and produce dimensionally accurate component on a CNC machine.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Additional Modules

  • Thermodynamics
  • Materials, Properties and Testing
  • Mechatronics
HND Mechanical Engineering Modules

RQF HND in Engineering (Mechanical)

Year One (Level 5)

Module Code and Title:

J/615/1502 – Unit 34: Research Project (30 Credits)

What’s it about?
This unit introduces students to the skills necessary to deliver a complex, independently conducted research project that fits within an engineering context.

What do I learn?

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to deliver a complex and independent research project in line with the original objectives, explain the critical thinking skills associated with solving engineering problems, consider multiple perspectives in reaching a balanced and justifiable conclusion, and communicate effectively a research project’s outcome.

What’s the assignment?

There will be two assessments to complete. One will be a presentation where you present your research findings to an invited audience. The second assignment will consist of the written report of your research including a literature review, an investigation into research methods and a critical evaluation.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

L/615/1503 – Unit 35: Professional Engineering Management (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
The aim of this unit is to continue building up on the knowledge gained in Unit 4: Managing a Professional Engineering Project, to provide students with the professional standards for engineers and to guide them on how to develop the range of employability skills needed by professional engineers.

What do I learn?

Among the topics included in this unit are: engineering strategy and services delivery planning, the role of sustainability, Total Quality Management (TQM), engineering management tools, managing people and becoming a professional engineer.

What’s the assignment?

There will be two assessments to complete. The first will be a report on a process or a product from your own workplace with some thoughts on improvement and refinement. The second is a presentation on your commitment to professional standards and obligations to society, the engineering profession and the environment.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

R/615/1504 – Unit 36: Advanced Mechanical Principles (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
This module is designed to introduce the students to advanced knowledge of the mechanical theories associated with engineering applications. You will gain an understanding of most of the machinery used within the engineering industry, and comprehend the physical laws that influence their operation.

What do I learn?

You will be able to investigate Poisson’s Ratio and typical values of common materials; the relationship between the elastic constants such as Bulk Modulus, Modulus of Elasticity, Modulus of Rigidity; the relationship between bending moment, slope and deflection in beams. You will also explore Macaulay’s method, analysing the stresses in thin-walled pressure vessels and stresses in thick-walled cylinders,

What’s the assignment?

There will be two assignments. The first part will involve calculations associated with materials subject to complex loading and the strength of beams under load and pressurised vessels. The second examines  power transmission system elements and operational constraints of dynamic rotating systems.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Y/615/1505 – Unit 37: Virtual Engineering (15 Credits)

What’s it about?
This module is designed to introduce the students to the application of relevant Computer Aided Design (CAD) and analysis engineering tools in contemporary engineering. You will learn about standards, regulations and legal compliance within the context of engineering.

What do I learn?

You will cover such topics as dimensioning and tolerances, standardisation and regulatory compliance (BS, ASTM, ISO, etc.), material properties and selection, manufacturing processes, 2D, 3D, CAD, solid modelling, one-dimensional and multidimensional problems, meshing and boundary conditions, and the finite volume method.


What’s the assignment?

There will be two assignments. The first part involves an evaluation of finite element analysis in the role of finding and solving potential structural and performance issues. The second is concerned with computational fluid dynamics (CFD).


Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

D/615/1506 – Unit 38: Further Thermodynamics (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

This module is designed to develop further students’ skills in applied thermodynamics by investigating the relationships between theory and practical applications.

What do I learn?

Among the topics included in this unit are: heat pumps and refrigeration, performance of air compressors, steam power plant and gas turbines. Students will be able to determine the performance and operation of heat pumps and refrigeration systems, review the applications and efficiency of industrial compressors amongst other applications.


What’s the assignment?

There will be two assignments. The first part is a written report into the operational performance of refrigeration, heat pump and air compression systems. The second is also a written report into steam plant parameters and the operation and efficiency of gas turbines. You will be expected to use steam charts and understand the Carnot and Rankine cycles.


Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

H/615/1507– Unit 39: Further Mathematics (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

The unit will prepare students to analyse and model engineering situations using mathematical techniques.

What do I learn?

Among the topics included in this unit are: number theory, complex numbers, matrix theory, linear equations, numerical integration, numerical differentiation, and graphical representations of curves for estimation within an engineering context. Finally, students will expand their knowledge of calculus to discover how to model and solve engineering problems using first and second order differential equations.

What’s the assignment?

There will be two assignments. The first involves a series of calculations related to de Moivre’s Theorem, Gaussian elimination and complex numb erfs. The second investigates differential calculus applied to engineering systems and approximate solutions to engineering problems using graphical and numerical methods.

Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

Y/615/1519– Unit 51: Sustainability (15 Credits)

What’s it about?

Engineers will be in the frontline of the battle to overcome the challenges of creating a sustainable economy, but no single discipline will have the capability to tackle the problems alone. Sustainability is a multidisciplinary challenge, and engineers of the future will have to work collaboratively with a whole range of other stakeholders.

What do I learn?

On successful completion of this unit the student with possess a wide range of knowledge and understanding of the issues and topics associated with sustainability and low carbon engineering.

What’s the assignment?

There will be two assignments. The first is a written report into the nature and scope of the technical challenges in providing sustainable development. It will also cover the importance of collaborating with other disciplines in finding appropriate solutions. The second is also a written report into alternative energy generation and how to calculate and alleviate carbon footprints.

 Want to know more?

To see the module description, please click here.

 

 


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All Fees and prices shown on the website are for courses starting in the 2018-19 or 2019-20 academic year and are correct at the time of entering/printing information, however these may be subject to change. The College cannot accept legal or financial liability as a result of any such changes.

The course information describes programmes offered by University Centre Colchester at Colchester Institute. The College takes all reasonable steps to provide courses as described, but cannot guarantee provision. The information is for guidance and does not form any part of a contract.

The College reserves the right to update and amend information as and when necessary. University Centre Colchester at Colchester Institute will do its best to provide the courses shown, but may have to modify or withdraw a course depending on customer demand and other factors.